Tag: Translation Project Management

XTM International Announces XTM Cloud v11.1

XTM International Announces XTM Cloud v11.1

London, April 16, 2018 — XTM International has released a new version of XTM Cloud. Building on the success of XTM v11, the new version adds many new features requested by users.

The integration with Google Sheets is a breakthrough achievement. XTM Connect for Google Sheets is intuitive and collaborative. Localization managers can push content for translation directly from the chosen columns or entire sheets. Completed translations are delivered into specified cells, and can be instantly shared with the rest of the teams. The process is fully automated and does not involve copy/pasting nor file exports. Translation takes less time as an outcome, and there are no version conflicts between the localized documents and their newer versions updated by copy writers.

Projects in XTM can now be assigned to language leads or in-house translators. The new user role has the rights to view and manage projects for their specified target languages. By doing so, in-house translators can translate texts in person or outsource them depending on the needs and the workload. In effect, they can reduce the turnaround time and gain extra flexibility to manage source text overflow.

“Our development strategy is focused on enhancing XTM with features that provide maximum value to our Enterprise and LSP users. We are delighted to release XTM Cloud v11.1, as it delivers a very useful set of enhancements to our growing customer base.” – said Bob Willans, CEO of XTM International.

Other main features include a new connector for Kentico, support for markdown (.md) source files, options to color or penalize language variant matches, and new REST and SOAP API methods.

For additional information about XTM and its new features, please visit https://xtm.cloud/release-notes/11.1/.

Reference: https://bit.ly/2HvnQS7

BOUTIQUE TRANSLATION AGENCIES: THE NEW GENERATION

BOUTIQUE TRANSLATION AGENCIES: THE NEW GENERATION

There was a time when dinosaurs dominated the world of translation: huge great lumbering beasts of companies with offices in every major world city and thousands of contractors at their fingertips. They offered every language pair, every specialism and every service under the sun, all overseen by huge teams of project managers in vast offices filled with piles of paperwork. But things don’t stay the same forever, and with the rise of the internet and a new focus on niche services a very different kind of professional translation service is on the rise: the boutique translation agency.

They may be small, but don’t underestimate their appeal to translators and clients alike.

What are boutique translation agencies?

LIGHT ON THEIR FEET

Boutique translation agencies take their cue from boutique advertising companies, the new form of PR that aimed to offer something different to the behemoths of the ad world. Just like their marketing forerunners, boutique translation agencies are small, nimble and fast-paced. Unlike the larger firms that worry so much about economies of scale, boutique agencies offer specialised services with a high degree of personalisation and flexibility.

Boutique firms have staff that can react quickly and flexibly to any new challenge, because they aren’t spending their time churning out huge amounts of repetitive work. They’re free to follow opportunities, evolve and change rapidly through time, leaving big global corporations in their dust. They don’t have a vast translation team of unknown and untested contractors, but rather they work with a small and trusted group of contacts, so the relationships within the agency tend to be closer. This means that quality control is not a matter of ticking boxes as it is with larger companies, but rather comes down to close working relationships where managers have in-depth, detailed knowledge of all their staff’s skills and strengths, and can draw together the perfect team for each project.

 EXACTLY WHAT YOU NEED

Specialisation is also one of the biggest strengths of these new and nimble agencies. Unlike massive international companies, they aren’t Jacks of all trades and masters of none. No one can truly specialise in everything, and larger companies run the risk of spreading themselves too thin at the expense of quality. Boutique agencies are at the other end of the scale, offering very specific niche services. They know their strengths and they know their target market’s needs, as well as having a comprehensive understanding of the language, culture or industry they specialise in.

Different firms have different ways of narrowing down to a specialisation. Some focus on a particular subject area or industry, for example legal, marketing or technical translations. These agencies focus on hiring translators who are experts within that industry, many of whom will have had a previous career elsewhere before becoming translators. Other agencies specialise in particular languages, amassing a team of native Russian translators, for example, but with a wide range of interests, knowledge and skills. These teams offer particular advantages because they can combine the different subject specialisms of their translators in line with the client’s needs. Many of these agencies also offer specialised services such as localisation, DTP or web services like SEO and web marketing, all in combination with translation. This allows a team of different professionals, all with a comprehensive understanding of your language pair or industry, to work together fluidly and produce an excellent finished product exactly to your specifications.

THE PERSONAL TOUCH

In line with the fantastic opportunities for specialisation that boutique agencies offer, clients and staff alike tend to find these firms are much more personal than the big multinationals.

Smaller agencies can offer a highly tailored and personalised service built around your needs rather than the company’s ‘way of doing things’. Instead of forcing you to fit their box, they will shape their work to suit your needs. You’re likely to experience less bureaucracy and paper pushing, because a smaller team can find common sense solutions instead of having to rely on endless protocols. And you’ll have access to the people that matter. Often a smaller translation company will be directly managed by the CEO, who isn’t a fat cat investor sitting in a board meeting or playing golf, but is more likely to be a translator him/herself. At the very least you’ll have a regular, designated contact person within the company over time, so you’ll have an opportunity to build a good working relationship with your own project manager. And with a smaller company the team that wins your business is the exact one that will work on your project; unlike some of the less scrupulous bigger companies they won’t impress you with the CVs of excellent translators and then farm your work out to untrained, poorly qualified individuals.

A by-product of all this is that boutique agencies tend to be more detail-oriented and creative than their larger cousins. Unbound by pointless rules and procedures they’re free to offer the kind of personalised service that has clients returning year after year.

THE CLIENT IS KING

Whereas big multinational corporations are bound by the bottom line, long-term relationships, reputation and old-fashioned business values mean everything to smaller companies. As they thrive by word-of-mouth and often keep their client list short, boutique agencies are heavily focused on client satisfaction and building trust. For smaller companies no account is too small to warrant their care and attention, and communication tends to be personal, efficient and meaningful.

Boutique agencies aren’t staffed by managers from other sectors with no real understanding of translation, and they don’t take on new translators with little evidence as to their skills and abilities. They tend to be run by passionate linguists who view their business as a vocation, not just a moneymaking exercise. That’s why you’ll often spot all kinds of added extra value when working with a boutique agency, along with a willingness to source additional services or skills in accordance with your needs. In short, they will go the extra mile for your business, because they know that’s how to win and keep custom.

THE BOTTOM LINE

Finally, you’ll get more bang for your buck with a boutique translation agency, as many of these companies offer outstanding value for money with no compromise on quality – in fact, often providing a more specialised and personalised service than a big provider of ‘off the peg’ translation solutions. They will be able to offer flexibility over rates and often have much lower overheads than multinationals. Some are based in countries with low tax rates and rents, while others save by managing their team online instead of assembling them in an office. Bearing all this in mind, a small budget to a global firm can often be quite a substantial one to a small agency, meaning you can get more for your money.

What aren’t boutique translation agencies?

EXCLUSIVE SERVICE, EVERYDAY PRICES

Boutique translation agencies needn’t be expensive. Although the term conjures an exclusive tailor-made experience, owing to the nature of these smaller companies you needn’t pay through the nose for it. For a start, they are less profit-oriented and more concerned with providing an excellent service, which is, after all, their unique selling point. Low overheads and innovative working practices also mean that if money is tight in your office a boutique agency might be just the right service provider for you.

FOCUSED, NOT LIMITED

Boutique translation agencies needn’t be limited in scope. Don’t confuse their emphasis on specialisation with a narrow focus. Any good small agency will have a network of highly skilled individuals on call, and can put together teams to tackle any text. The difference between these smaller translation agencies and the corporate giants is that boutique agencies know their limits and will not take on work on spec without knowing they can deliver. They also don’t keep huge numbers of staff on their permanent payroll just to cover any eventuality, so they can really save you money.

MIDDLEMEN BEGONE!

Small translation firms know that you want to pay for fantastic translation, not layer upon layer of middle management. You’ll have a project manager, whose role is to know the team inside out and be able to pick out the best individuals for your project. Good project managers are indispensable after all – but you won’t be paying for heads of business development, corporate strategists, marketing gurus, IT departments or any other of the staff members so indispensable to bigger clients. Instead you’ll find your team is flexible and diverse enough to tackle any of the challenges that come their way.

UP CLOSE AND PERSONAL

Boutique translation agencies are the very opposite of corporate. You’re not just a number on a spreadsheet and you won’t receive formulaic service – rather the whole experience will be shaped around you. These firms don’t tend to be concerned with growth at any cost, but rather they prioritise building and maintaining a cast-iron reputation in a specific field. There are no economies of scale, which means every client matters, and customer service is by nature at the very heart of everything they do.

It easy to see why these agencies are becoming more and more popular, and in some sectors are now starting to corner the translation market. Bigger companies are running scared and looking to find ways to streamline their service offerings, but savvy clients are still abandoning impersonal companies in their droves, looking for something different. In the battle of David and Goliath you’d be forgiven for betting on the big guy, but don’t rule out the underdog. Putting meaning and value back at the heart of the translation process, it looks like these plucky contenders are here to stay.

Reference: https://bit.ly/2og0aWS

DQF: What is it? and How it works?

DQF: What is it? and How it works?

What does DQF stand for?

DQF stands for the Dynamic Quality Framework. Quality is considered Dynamic as translation quality requirements change depending on the content type, the purpose of the content and its audience.

Why is DQF the industry benchmark?

DQF has been co-created since January 2011 by over fifty companies and organizations. Contributors include translation buyers, translation service providers, and translation technology suppliers. Practitioners continue to define requirements and best practices as they evolve through regular meetings and events.

How does DQF work?

DQF provides a commonly agreed approach to select the most appropriate translation quality evaluation model(s) and metrics depending on specific quality requirements. The underlying process, technology and resources affect the choice of quality evaluation model. DQF Content Profiling, Guidelines and Knowledge base are used when creating or refining a quality assurance program. DQF provides shared language, guidance on process and standardized metrics to help users execute quality programs more consistently and effectively. Improving efficiency within organizations and through supply chains. The result is increased customer satisfaction and a more credible quality assurance function in the translation industry.

The Content Profiling feature is used to help select the most appropriate quality evaluation model for specific requirements. This leads to the Knowledge base where you find best practices, metrics, step-by-step guides, reference templates, and use cases. The Guidelines are publicly available summaries for parts of the Knowledge base as well as related topics.

What is included in DQF?

1. Content Profiling and Knowledge base

The DQF Content Profiling Wizard is used to help select the most appropriate quality evaluation model for specific requirements. In the Knowledge Base you find supporting best practices, metrics, step-by-step guides, reference templates, use cases and more.

2. Tools

A set of tools that allows users to do different types of evaluations: adequacy, fluency, error review, productivity measurement, MT ranking and comparison. The DQF tools can be used in the cloud, offline or indirectly through the DQF API.

3. Quality Dashboard

The Quality Dashboard is available as an industry-shared platform. In the dashboard, evaluation and productivity data is visualized in a flexible reporting environment. Users can create customized reports or filter data to be reflected in the charts. Both internal and external benchmarking is supported, offering the possibility to monitor one’s own development and to compare results to industry highs, lows and averages.

4. API

The DQF API allows users to assess productivity, efficiency and quality on the fly while in the translation production mode. Developers and integrators are invited to use the API and connect with DQF from within their TMS or CAT tool environments.

References: Taus

Trello: Collaborative Task and Project Management

Trello: Collaborative Task and Project Management

Organizing our lives these days has become difficult. Thanks to websites and software dedicated to project management and organization of routines, you can now get your tasks sorted in a priority order. Here we are reviewing Trello, a free project management tool that can be used by individuals and businesses alike for managing their work. Not only does Trello make your life easier, but it also provides a lot of convenience that regular email communication does not provide. Let’s see how to use Trello to manage your tasks.

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Projetex 10 Released!

Projetex 10 Released!

A bunch of new features and compatibility with Windows 8 and 8.1

Compatibility

  • Full support of Windows 8, Windows 8.1 and Windows Server 2012.
  • Compatibility of built-in AnyCount Engine with Microsoft Office 2013

Analytics

  • Application-wide support for base volume units, similarly to base currency.
  • New Group by option with calculation of subtotals in most tables displayed.
  • Experience Stats for Corporate Experts

Automation

Projetex Automation Engine:

  • Email reminders for Projects, Clients, Quotes, Client Jobs, Corporate Jobs, Freelance Jobs, Invoices, POs.
  • Email reminder templates customization.
  • Email reminder log.

Security

  • Audit logging.
  • Reports can be assigned to different groups.

Flexibility

  • Corporate Experts can now be paid both by hours and by words, etc.
  • Corporate Experts now can have their currencies, price lists, payments, balances, etc.
  • A new “Base Unit” feature with a possibility to set units exchange rates.
  • “Mark as Paid” button for POs.
  • “Create Invoice” button for Edit Client Job window.
  • Folder sorting is now available in Projetex File Manager.
  • A date of annual numbering resets is now selectable.
  • Quotes can now include taxes and discounts.
  • Now Jobs can be modified within an Invoice, JA or PO edit window.
  • Credit Notes.

Integrity

More control on the alerts for wrong input:

  • Expert Job Total exceeds the Client Job’s Total;
  • Expert Job Volume exceeds the Client Job’s Volume;
  • Expert Job Deadline is later than the Client Job’s Deadline

Reporting

5 new reports:

  • Corporate Expert – Completed Jobs – selected month;
  • Freelance Experts – Total Orders;
  • Sales List;
  • User Activity by types – selected period and user;
  • Users Activity by types – selected period;

Bonus

  • Automatic display of local time at client or translator location.

Learn more about Projetx at: http://www.projetex.com/product-info/benefits/