Tag: Translation Project Management

memoQ 8.6 is Here!

memoQ 8.6 is Here!

memoQ 8.6 is our third release in 2018, and we are very excited about the new functionality it brings. The highlight of 8.6 is definitely the aim to pave the way to a more CMS-friendly translation environment, but like previous versions, it includes enhancements in many areas, including integration, terminology, productivity features, file filters, and user experience. Learn more about the most recent version and see how it will help you be even more productive.

 

Read full list of features.

Why you need to localize Even if your audience only speaks English

Why you need to localize Even if your audience only speaks English

There are many companies who cater solely to their own language. That is, they only provide products and services in their native tongue, whether that be English, Spanish, French, Chinese, or any of the arguably thousands of living languages spoken around the world. So, if an organization caters to customers who predominantly speak only one language, is there even a need to localize? In one word, yes.

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Lessons in Building a Language Industry Startup

Lessons in Building a Language Industry Startup

Bryan Forrester, CEO of Boostlingo, Matt Conger, CEO of Cadence Translate, and Jeffrey Sandford, Co-Founder and CTO of Wovn Technologies joined Smart on stage to share their experiences and insights with the 120 senior executives in attendance.

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KPIs for the Translation Business: A Brief Intro

KPIs for the Translation Business: A Brief Intro

How to Choose Your KPIs Wisely

Different companies will have different KPIs based on their individual goals. Generally speaking, translation volume, revenue growth, or reputation could be considered as valid goals for a translation business.

If you want to measure and grow your translation volume, you’ll need KPIs related to sales and/or client acquisition. For example:

  • Monthly sales/new customers

  • Monthly new leads/prospects

  • Customer retention rate

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VideoLocalize: A Case Study in Innovation

VideoLocalize: A Case Study in Innovation

VideoLocalize is a video localization platform that was developed by the Boffin Language Group to address a well-known challenge in the area of video localization. In its current shape, VideoLocalize integrates a synchronization tool with voice-talent and project management capabilities, allowing the end-to-end management of video localization projects.  It wasn’t conceived of in this way, however, and the journey that the Boffin Language Group undertook under the leadership of its President, George Zhao, is a case study in innovation.

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How to be a Superhero Vendor Manager?

How to be a Superhero Vendor Manager?

Imagine you receive a new translation request, into your company’s local language. Who would you assign this project to? Write the name of the translator that you would contact first.

That’s the task we all received during my vendor management training over 10 years ago in Rome. There were 15 participants together with me, sitting at a huge U-shaped table. Each of us wrote down one name and then we read it out loud one after another to the whole group. It was easy, we did it quickly and we were all happy we did a good job.

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What do You Want to See?

What do You Want to See?

Dears,

Thanks for visiting our blog!

Please share with us what do you want to see in our blog during the next period and what are the topics that interest you?

Thanks!

Files, Files Everywhere: The Subtle Power of Translation Alignment

Files, Files Everywhere: The Subtle Power of Translation Alignment

Here’s the basic scenario: you have the translated versions of your documents, but the translation wasn’t performed in a CAT tool and you have to build a translation memory because these documents need to be updated or changed across the languages, you want to retain the existing elements, style and terminology, and you have integrated CAT technology in your processes in the meantime. The solution is a neat piece of language engineering called translation alignment.

Translation alignment is a native feature of most productivity tools for computer-assisted translation, but its application in real life is limited to very specific situations, so even the language professionals rarely have an opportunity to use it. However, these situations do happen once in while and when they do, alignment usually comes as a trusty solution for process optimization. We will take a look at two actual cases to show you what exactly it does.

Example No. 1: A simple case

Project outline:

Three Word documents previously translated to one language, totaling 6000 unweighted words. Two new documents totaling around 2500 words that feature certain elements of the existing files and need to follow the existing style and terminology.

Project execution:

Since the translated documents were properly formatted and there were no layout issues, the alignment process was completed almost instantly. The software was able to segmentize the source files and we matched the translated segments, with some minor tweaking of segmentation. We then built a translation memory from those matched segments and added the new files to the project.

The result:

Thanks to the created translation assets, the final wordcount of the new content was around 1500 and our linguists were able to produce translation in accordance with the previously established style and terminology. The assets were preserved for use on future projects.

Example No.2: An extreme case of multilingual alignment

Project outline:

In one of our projects we had to develop translation assets in four language pairs, totaling roughly 30k words per language. The source materials were expanded with new content totaling about 20k words unweighted and the language assets had to be developed both to retain the existing style and terminology solution and to help the client switch to a new CAT platform.

Project execution:

Unfortunately, there was no workaround for ploughing through dozens of files, but once we organized the materials we could proceed to the alignment phase. Since these files were localized and some parts were even transcreated to match the target cultures, which also included changes in layout and differences in content, we knew that alignment was not going to be fully automated.

This is why native linguists in these languages performed the translation alignment and communicated with the client and the content producer during this phase. While this slowed the process a bit, it ultimately yielded the best results possible.

We then exported the created translation memory in the cross-platform TMXformat that allowed use in different CAT tools and the alignment phase was finished.

The result:

With the TM applied, the weighted volume of new content was around 7k words. Our linguists localized the new materials in accordance with the existing conventions in the new CAT platform and the translation assets were saved for future use.

Wrap up

In both cases, translation alignment enabled us to reduce the volume of the new content for translation and localization and ensure stylistic and lexical consistencywith the previously translated materials. It also provided an additional, real-time quality control and helped our linguists produce a better translation in less time.

Translation alignment is not an everyday operation, but it is good to know that when it is called to deliver the goods, this is exactly what it does.

Reference: https://bit.ly/2p5aYr0