Tag: Machine Translation

How can word counts differ within the same tool on different machines? (2)

How can word counts differ within the same tool on different machines? (2)

Have you ever run a word count with the same document on two different machines and received different word counts?

Well, here is what can have an impact on the word count statistics:

  • The use of a TM on one machine and no TM on the other machine can produce different word counts. A project with no TM will use default settings for counting, which might have been adjusted in the TM you actually use. For example, the setting to count words with hyphens as one or two words.

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Translation Automation with a Human Touch

Translation Automation with a Human Touch

Automation is advancing quickly in the translation industry, too. Translation management systems are becoming comprehensive service platforms with numerous functionalities to help your company reach the highest level of efficiency possible. But although there are almost always brilliant technological solutions available for every single problem or action, a human touch can sometimes make the difference.

Find out more from here

 

Transitioning to a post-editing machine translation business model

Transitioning to a post-editing machine translation business model

When someone argues that MT engines produce poor results, the first thing I ask is when they last tested machine translation. Many in the industry are still basing their opinion on results from years ago, which are no longer valid. The reality is that machine translation is cheaper, faster, more secure, and increasingly better quality. LSPs that do not adopt this quickly dominating technology will not be able to compete in this new market.

Read more about machine translation post editing.

Here’s Why Neural Machine Translation is a Huge Leap Forward

Here’s Why Neural Machine Translation is a Huge Leap Forward

When building rules-based machine translation systems, linguists and computer scientists joined forces to write thousands of rules for translating text from one language to another. This was good enough for monolingual reviewers to be able to get the general idea of important documents in an otherwise unmanageable body of content in a language they couldn’t read. But for the purposes of actually creating good translations, this approach has obvious flaws: it’s time-consuming and, naturally, results in low quality translations.

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Will the interpreter survive technology?

Will the interpreter survive technology?

The Mesay 3.0 translation computer was launched as a crowdfunding project earlier this week. The device, made by Mesay in Shenzhen, China, is the third edition of the Mesay translation computer, offering simultaneous two-way voice and text translation in 50 languages without the need for any apps.
Mesay had already introduced the Mesay and Mesay 2.0 in the last years, but Mesay 3.0 has a new design and offers WIFI and Hotspot support, while its double microphones must ensure that spoken words are recognized more accurately. According to the Indiegogo project page the crowdfunding project only needs $3,000 to get the project successfully funded; at the time of writing this review and blog the project was 60% funded already. The early bird price for one Mesay is $99, but the actual retail price will be $179.

To know more about it, click here Mesay 3.0 translation computer

Across Systems Presents New Major Release of its Across Language Server

Across Systems Presents New Major Release of its Across Language Server

Karlsbad. Across Systems GmbH has released version 7 of its translation management software Across Language Server. Under the motto “Speed up your translation processes”, the main benefits of the new major release include optimized translation processes and seamless connection of third-party machine translation systems.

Check the full release from this link.

A Translator’s Take on MT

A Translator’s Take on MT

There’s been a lot of buzz around artificial intelligence and machine learning lately. Both technologies are being heavily invested in, and their practical use cases range from gimmicky to life-changing. Depending on who you ask, emotions surrounding the topic range from optimism to fear. Freelance translators often loathe the rise of machine translation engines – automated systems that can translate entire documents by themselves, and quite well too. These engines can pose a threat to our livelihood, and sketch a possible future where humans merely function as guidance, while machines do the real grunt work. The same work that we as translators love so much.

Read the full article from here.