Tag: human-aided machine translation

Ethics in Machine Translation [Podcast]

Ethics in Machine Translation [Podcast]

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We’re in a localization and globalization market now where more words are translated every day through machine translation than what was translated in the entire human language corpus in the past.

Not only does such a massive amount of machine translation radically change the role of human translators, it also creates a whole new range of issues that impact the translation and globalization paradigm itself.

And one of the most important issues is ethics.

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MT Isn’t Good For Languages, But..

MT Isn’t Good For Languages, But..

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In a Sci-Fi movie we all know, there is the machine invention merging in to fulfill a certain demand and a great need covering all the routine and dangerous work. But, there is this end; that we all know by heart as well, the machine evolves and revolts against the maker and works for the maker’s destruction. This shows us the double edged weapon that the machine has. In this article we will reflect these edges: pros and cons, of the machine translation.

The machine has been always a great tool in saving time and money for the sake of exerting the effort to enhance it to produce a better quality. Luckily, we have achieved this, and the machine translation has saved a lot of time translating repetitive content such as the financial field that is full of numbers and the technical content that is full of saved terminology,…etc. Machine translation also grants accuracy translating such content, where no complex structure or ambiguity surrounds the content. It also translates fast, which means less time; and in a world where time means money; this is the best to rely on.

Such applications also evolved to translate images and signs on the spot. Imagine you’re lost in a country you don’t speak its language! No one to understand, no one to ask!

If a programmer or a developer wants to make his application or software or even a website to be used in the whole world, what would he do? Get translators from all the whole world and pay them and get broke before he even takes off?

Machine translation is the answer here as well, as it will be of a great help to this programmer because such a repetitive content will can be translated in a good quality.

On the other hand, the climax of the movie emerges. And we come to the question: does it scheme to destroy the translation profession and the death of the language?

Did it prove high quality in the artistic translation? No, why?

This is due some factors, which are:

  • Perplexity

Language is an evolving living entity. One of the language schools measured the elevation of a language by its ability to complicate. The more complicated the structure and the diction, the higher this language.

Unfortunately, machine translation lacks the ability to deal or understand such complication. This, by turn lead us to the length ratio.

  • Length Ratio

After much trainings and tests to the machine translation followed by evaluation, it appears that the produced is more of chopped sentences, cut off, simple, and normalized affected by the source. This also relates to the language complication; consequently, it defies the language elevation and richness. And speaking of richness, we go to

  • Lexical Density

According to MacMillan Dictionary, it is: “the proportion of content words to function words in a text. The higher the proportion of content words, the greater the lexical density”.

Machine translation is effective at these types of texts that don’t really have many of content words, and it gets sometimes lost the more content words existed. This also applies to the diverse significant word in a translated text, which adds to the richness and the uniqueness of the language. How does the machine translation work with this?

The Machine works with the most frequent words, to keep the text consistent; which threatens the less frequent words with death and oblivion.

However, don’t get disappointed dear linguist, there is this MT Summit that gets to be held globally every 2 years, and regionally every year. They discuss such issues and they try to find solutions for it based on research papers and tests with evaluations. Furthermore, we have you to post-edit these translations, creatively. Machine translation will never replace you, it’s just you who will upgrade and drench yourself more in your language linguistics.

Here, we reach a conclusion that tells us that machine translation is not scheming to the linguists death, unless they allowed, for sure. Nevertheless, it might affect the language.

You do what you got to do.

How can word counts differ within the same tool on different machines? (2)

How can word counts differ within the same tool on different machines? (2)

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Have you ever run a word count with the same document on two different machines and received different word counts?

Well, here is what can have an impact on the word count statistics:

  • The use of a TM on one machine and no TM on the other machine can produce different word counts. A project with no TM will use default settings for counting, which might have been adjusted in the TM you actually use. For example, the setting to count words with hyphens as one or two words.

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Translation Automation with a Human Touch

Translation Automation with a Human Touch

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Automation is advancing quickly in the translation industry, too. Translation management systems are becoming comprehensive service platforms with numerous functionalities to help your company reach the highest level of efficiency possible. But although there are almost always brilliant technological solutions available for every single problem or action, a human touch can sometimes make the difference.

Find out more from here

 

Transitioning to a post-editing machine translation business model

Transitioning to a post-editing machine translation business model

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When someone argues that MT engines produce poor results, the first thing I ask is when they last tested machine translation. Many in the industry are still basing their opinion on results from years ago, which are no longer valid. The reality is that machine translation is cheaper, faster, more secure, and increasingly better quality. LSPs that do not adopt this quickly dominating technology will not be able to compete in this new market.

Read more about machine translation post editing.

Here’s Why Neural Machine Translation is a Huge Leap Forward

Here’s Why Neural Machine Translation is a Huge Leap Forward

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When building rules-based machine translation systems, linguists and computer scientists joined forces to write thousands of rules for translating text from one language to another. This was good enough for monolingual reviewers to be able to get the general idea of important documents in an otherwise unmanageable body of content in a language they couldn’t read. But for the purposes of actually creating good translations, this approach has obvious flaws: it’s time-consuming and, naturally, results in low quality translations.

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Translation Memory and Survival

Translation Memory and Survival

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Written by:  Eman Elbehiry

Homer and Langley Collyer, two brothers, were killed by “hoarding”, and storing things in their house. That led psychology scientists to categorizing this “hoarding” under “psychological disease” umbrella. But when it comes to Translation, sorry psychology! You’re wrong this time. Why? Because “Hoarding” is a big sign of perfectionism, and adulthood.

How many times did you looked at your outstanding translation and wished you could use it again? How many times have you came across a sentence that you bet your life that you have translated it before, but unfortunately you can’t remember in which file, or which project exactly? How many times have you translated similar texts, and wished for something that could help you get the job done in half of its time?
Though you are stuck in only “wishing”, hoarding and storing this translation has found its way to you through translation memories, TM.

While the CAT tool divides the whole text into segments, the translation memory becomes where all your translation is stored in units; exactly as it was saved either in sentences, paragraphs, headlines, or titles. Which means that it stores the segment with its language pair. Consequently, you can get back to it in the time of need. According to SDL description of the translation memory “When a translator’s jobs regularly contain the same kinds of phrases and sentences, a translation memory will drastically increase the speed of translation.” This makes it one essential component of any CAT tool par excellence.

Later, when you summon this translation memory to re-use this “stored” translation; it starts suggesting for you a translation. You can add and enhance this translation, you can modify it, or replace it with a better one. For the translation memory being so smart; it updates itself all through. It has whatever you added, and enhanced. If the translator accepted the exact suggested translation, the tool will choose to call this an exact match; which is percented as 100%.  We can see this crystal clear especially in the texts that include a lot of repeated patterns. Furthermore the minimum similarity between a new segment and a saved segment in TM varies from 99% to 50% depending on the similarity match is called “Fuzzy match”.

According to what we mentioned above, the translation memory is best fit for texts including repetitions, or similarities. Which means that it is most suitable for technical, and legal translations, for having specialized and repeated expressions and vocabularies. Moreover, if you are working on one project in a team, it is very possible that each translator have his own distinctive expressions, and vocabulary in his mind, but if you are working with one translation memory, your documents will be more coherent and cohesive, and you are always on the same track.
As a result to this, translation memory saves time and efforts, which results in reducing the cost of the long-termed projects. Therefore, by now, we agree that it provides the best quality possible, and it’s definitely unlimited.

            Genius ha! Wondering how it works? Here is a hint:
The mechanism is called “Edit Distance”. This mechanism’s role is to identify how dissimilar two entities (e.g words, segments, units) are. Thus, in the case of the fuzzy match, it tries to measure approximately how close these two patterns are, and consequently, suggests to the translators who have the power to accept or modify, so that it could improve itself.

            The translation memory allows you to use it hundreds of times, to include it in whatever project and keep updating it. But the question here is “What if I didn’t use it before, will my past treasure go in vain?” The answer is NO!
Actually you are allowed to “Align” the segments of your past work to make a translation memory out of it, we will explain that the alignment in another article. It will also be your own made-dictionary to search in your previous work for any terms, sentences. In addition to this, you will be able to share your translation memory, and use the shared-with you, so that you have a solid, and saving base. The reviewer can have a part of the share with you so you have everything updated, and flawless. This is seen usually in the online tools. And yes it happens to have a movement of exchanging translation memories. “Sharing is caring” right?!

            And here emerges another question, which is: What if I am using a specific tool, while my peers, or my reviewers are using another? How can I share with them my TM? Or how do they share theirs?
Now, there is an extension for sharing which is “TMx” (Translation Memory Exchange). This allows you to import and export the translation memory among many different tools. Never easier!

According to Martín-Mor (2011), the use of TM systems does have an effect on the quality of the translated texts, especially on novices, but experienced translators are able to avoid it.” And here we say to all translators, experienced or beginners, “hoarding” is not killing, and there is nothing better than hoarding and storing years of hard work embracing experience. This storing and hoarding is exactly “what doesn’t kill you makes you stronger”.

Share with us a story in which you used a TM and it was super beneficial!

Nimdzi Language Technology Atlas

Nimdzi Language Technology Atlas

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For this first version, Nimdzi has mapped over 400 different tools, and the list is growing quickly. The Atlas consists of an infographic accompanied by a curated spreadsheet with software listings for various translation and interpreting needs.

As the language industry becomes more technical and complex, there is a growing need for easy-to-understand materials explaining available tech options. The Nimdzi Language Technology Atlas provides a useful view into the relevant technologies available today.

Software users can quickly find alternatives for their current tools and evaluate market saturation in each segment at a glance. Software developers can identify competition and find opportunities in the market with underserved areas.

Reference: https://bit.ly/2ticEyT