Tag: CAT Tools

Across Systems Presents New Major Release of its Across Language Server

Across Systems Presents New Major Release of its Across Language Server

Reading Time: 1 minute

Karlsbad. Across Systems GmbH has released version 7 of its translation management software Across Language Server. Under the motto “Speed up your translation processes”, the main benefits of the new major release include optimized translation processes and seamless connection of third-party machine translation systems.

Check the full release from this link.

Why should you CAT tool your translation?

Why should you CAT tool your translation?

Reading Time: 4 minutes

Written by:  Eman Elbehiry

As long as the early human was living, he searched for ways to survive, to facilitate life, to save time and energy, and to develop and move his life to another level. Thus, he worked his available tools like dry grass, leaves, and bark to make his first flame of fire. Since then he had an incredible power to make nature submit to his power. The early human taught us a lesson, in addition to this marvelous discovery; he taught us the skill of searching for what makes us win in our battle with time. The fire to the translator is CAT tools.

In the time the translator is fed up of going back and forth for what he translated before, to what he missed up in one file out of many and his desire to revise them all once again, CAT tools were there to give him a helping hand. In his time dreaming of something that can store his translation, his dictionaries, in addition to having grammar and spell checkers in one place, CAT tools were his fulfilling jinni. The term “CAT tools” stands for “Computer-Aided Translation”. As the name signifies, the computer helps and supports us in translation process through managing, organizing, checking the quality, and storing our translation. Having all these features does not mean that it translates on its own; on the contrary, as a translator, you do the work.

A CAT tool has some basic components: first, the translation memory, abbreviated as TM. This memory stores our translation in units to be restored in the time of need. Second, the dictionaries for retrieving words, and checking the spelling. Third, the Term-base: the term base is like a glossary for terms that has a long explanation put in a long cluster of words or in expressions. It also could have a thorough clarification for an abbreviation. It is highly important for specific translations like the medical, and the legal. Fourth, segmentation, and the segment isn’t actually a complete sentence. It could be a long sentence, a long statement, a complete paragraph. This division depends on the punctuation of the language. The tool divides the file to segments, each segment has its own organization, layout, and format which we call “tags”. Simply, the tool can help you copying the same format from the source to target, without going into the hustle of translation and formatting the text.

CAT tools are three types: the online, the offline, and the one that collects both, the “hybrid”. First, the online tools, like the “Smart CAT”; it helps in managing the workflow through establishing a shared platform with the team with a shared, updatable, translation memories. It also grants saving time because the translator, reviewer, and proofreader, can work in parallel. It also allows the manger to follow the progress of his team. Second, the offline tools, SDL Trados is one of the most leading tools in the market. The third one is like Memsource. It works both online and offline, and also update the translation memories, and the termbases.

As a result of these magnificent features, we can say that the CAT tools are a great addition to the industry. Big projects that are full repetitions are done with the highest performance possible. It would even facilitate the coming tasks by saving what you already translated. Furthermore, CAT tools in action grants you the best quality, with standardized terminology if you are working in a team. In addition to this, it can analyze your files word by word to be paid fairly.

Bottom line, CAT tools are great piece of technology that grants any quality with best quality and organization for preserving time, energy, and to keep all the members of the time on the same track of terminology, synonyms using the same glossary and expressions.

Here we give you some of the reviews about CAT tools. Caner K. who is a validated reviewer, and a verified current user of Trados says: “What business problems are you solving with the product? What benefits have you realized?

Most technical translations have repeating phrases and Trados makes it easier to translate these. So you save time by skipping translating the same words and sentences. It also makes collaborating on a long translation easier with a fellow translator. You can constantly share your translation memory with a colleague and make translating even more easier. The target text is usually more cohesive when two translators work on one text and the same translation memory.”

Ekaterina B. also is validated reviewer, and a verified current user of Trados says:”

What do you like best?
Trados is an essential tool for this business. It increases productivity and is a door opener when doing business with big clients.
The new UpLift capability is wonderful. Fragment matches have saved me so much time!”

About Matecat, one of the online CAT tools, Jorge Herran, a Spanish translator, says:

“It is an outstanding CAT tool, I have worked with SDL, Fluency, OmegaT and other CAT tools and in most cases this one allows me to work faster using a much better quality automatic translation as a base for my work, I still have to learn more about it, but so far, even if it lacks of many features, looks like a very promising CAT tool.”

             

What about you? Will you consider working with a CAT tool? Share with us your opinion!

2019 language services industry events you won’t want to miss!

2019 language services industry events you won’t want to miss!

Reading Time: 1 minute

Perhaps the best job perk of working in localization is the opportunity to travel to new places and meet fascinating people. But travel budgets are not infinite, so first you need to sit down and prioritize your travel itinerary. Nimdzi has once again made this easy for you by preparing a list of top 2019 events for – or related to – the language services industry.

Check out the events list from here.

memoQ Trend Report 2019

memoQ Trend Report 2019

Reading Time: 1 minute

A curious look from the memoQ team into the most important developments we believe will influence the landscape of translation technology and related fields in the coming year.

Read full report from here.
memoQ 8.6 is Here!

memoQ 8.6 is Here!

Reading Time: 1 minute

memoQ 8.6 is our third release in 2018, and we are very excited about the new functionality it brings. The highlight of 8.6 is definitely the aim to pave the way to a more CMS-friendly translation environment, but like previous versions, it includes enhancements in many areas, including integration, terminology, productivity features, file filters, and user experience. Learn more about the most recent version and see how it will help you be even more productive.

 

Read full list of features.

Translators and Technology: Friends or Foes?

Translators and Technology: Friends or Foes?

Reading Time: 1 minute

It is a fact that different kinds of technology creep into the translation industry on all levels. As a result, some participants in this magical process of transforming a text to fit a different language, cultural, and sociological community, can feel quite uneasy, or even anxious. Will machine translation (MT) reach parity with human translation (HT)? Will there be a need for translators?

 

Read full article from here.

Smart devices and the future of CAT tools

Smart devices and the future of CAT tools

Reading Time: 6 minutes

CAT tools have already been on the market for many years now and yet they are still improving. New technologies and emerging needs from translators are triggering a shift from computer-aided translation tools to smart device-aided translations tools. Does the future of productivity lie in web-based translation environments?

The emergence of online translation environments

While CAT tools nowadays are inevitable in the toolkit of translators, it is still not long ago that professional translators had to work without them. The tools for computer-aided translation, not to be confused with online translation tools like Google Translate, only emerged in the early 1990s. Although there might have been some earlier attempts to create software that helps translators to improve their quality, productivity and consistency, in the last decade of the last century they came into full swing. Nowadays translators can choose from at least 20 different CAT tools, both online and offline, to suit their needs out of which SDL Trados and MemoQ are by far the best known.
However, only 25 years after the introduction of mainstream translation software a new era is on the horizon. The introduction of cloud technology, the rise of digital nomads, and the general availability of cheap and fast internet connections has led to a new branch on the CAT tool tree: translators can now use online translation environments, both free and paid, to work wherever they choose to.

Translating online

The technological advancements in the last couple of years opened great opportunities for companies who looked beyond traditional CAT tools and wanted to pluck the low-hanging fruit of the cloud’s capabilities. Several professionals, both from inside and outside the translation industry, quickly introduced their own online variants of the desktop translation tools. Examples included Smartling and Memsource (which has a desktop tool as well). These tools are browser-based, which means that they are accessible as webpages and can be used to work wherever users want as long as they have a compatible device and an internet connection. The online translation environments offer full functionality, which is often equivalent to the standard desktop tools. Users (in the case of Smartling and Memsource mainly project managers) can create translation memories and term bases, set rules for quality assurance and require users to perform several checks before they can deliver their translations. The tools also offer support for the most common file formats, like Microsoft Office files, PDF files and HTML documents, but also for bilingual filetypes like XLIFF and the proprietary formats of Trados and MemoQ. In addition, they often have familiar user interfaces, with well-known toolbars and panels that make it easier for project managers and translators alike to find their way in the online CAT tool.

It might be clear that the new members in the CAT tool family are working disruptively to shake up the CAT tool industry. It is therefore not a surprise that after the introduction of new online CAT tools developers of ‘traditional’ CAT tools also came up with an online version. MemoQ introduced MemoQ Web while SDL brought SDL Online Translation Editor to the table.

Web-based CAT tools for translators

The most important feature of the web-based CAT tools is, (how surprising), that they work in a browser. Most of them were initially designed to work on a desktop, offering translators a convenient tool with omnipresent accessibility while at the same time making it easier for project managers to dispense projects. Indeed, project managers only had to upload files, create or connect a translation memory, and send a link to multiple translators, making it easier to complete projects, shorten the turnaround time, and circumvent lengthy discussions via email. But because these new online CAT tools were mainly directed at agencies and project managers, they fell short of meeting the needs of translators who wanted to work on the go. Other bright minds therefore developed new web-based CAT tools that supported the needs of the freelance translator better: in the past few years Lilt and Smartcat were introduced, among others. The SDL Online Translation Editor has also been created with freelance professionals in mind, while MemoQ Web is more dedicated to project managers.

The biggest difference between tools for freelance translators and project managers is their workflow. While project managers have loads of options to manage projects, tools like Lilt and Smartcat introduce only the options freelancers need: they can upload a file in different file types, create or use a translation memory (term bases are often not supported), work their way through the file, and complete the job. The tools have a familiar and simple user interface, so translators do not need to look for advanced options, but often, powerful options are hidden under the bonnet, so they can really compete with their desktop equivalents.
Another major advantage of CAT tools in the cloud is that they frequently release new features quickly and respond to feature requests even faster, while traditional CAT tools often require months for implementing, testing, and introducing new features in a newly built (minor) version of their tool.

Another major difference is that many tools aimed at freelancers are free to use. They offer various plans for advanced users, often based on the amount of characters being translated, but there is only one free flavour, and it comes without many of the options that paid users have access to.

Privacy concerns with online CAT environments

In the past few years the online CAT tools have quickly risen to the level at which they can compete with traditional computer-based CAT tools. Where CAT tools have evolved and added new features with every new release, their online counterparts were introduced according to the status quo of traditional CAT tools. They sometimes even introduced ground-breaking new features that traditional CAT tools were not able to offer, like Lilt’s adaptive machine translation.
Yet among translators there is still much debate about their adaptations. The most important concern is that of privacy. While computer resources are generally considered a safe option, many translators are afraid to use cloud environments because of the risk of hacks and leaks that expose clients’ confidential information. At the same time, using a free online translation environment sometimes requires that translations are shared with the platform provider to improve the quality of generally available translation memories and machine translation services. Freelancers, whose business depends on credibility, simply cannot afford to share their client’s information for the sake of improving their productivity or flexibility.
On the other hand, early adopters and technology enthusiasts debate that the cloud is much safer than many computers thanks to continuous security updates. However, they are only a small group in the world of translators.

From CAT to SAT?

Whatever the privacy concerns, until now the introduction of online CAT tools has made clear that they are here to stay. With the increasing adaptation of online tools, lifestyles shifting to working on the go, and digital nomadism it is expected that online translation environments will be increasingly in demand in the future.
Although traditional CAT tools do not offer any opportunities to be run on smart devices with an Android, iOS, or Windows Phone operating system, online CAT tools do not have this problem. That means that they can be used without barriers on smartphones and tablets, once they have been adopted on a computer. Indeed they offer the same experience everywhere as they are browser-based and do not need to be adapted much to work in different operating environments. An added advantage of this possibility is that users can start a task on their desktop, then work on it while away, and complete it in a third environment.

Yet, despite the seemingly endless possibilities of the online CAT tools, many of them still do not offer a flawless experience on smartphones and tablets. One of the biggest disadvantages of the browser-based tools is that they do not fit neatly onto the small screens of smart devices. A short experiment with a few translation platforms (Smartcat and Lilt; SDL’s Online Translator Editor returned an error) quickly showed that the user interface has problems with touch-enabled devices. While all elements of a CAT tool (the panel with the bilingual format, a panel with translation memory results, a concordance panel, and some other interface elements) are present, they often do not fit neatly. While the interface appears fine in its initial state, touching a text box to add a translation will cause the panels to be re-arranged every time. Furthermore after touching the screen the screen keyboard pops up, often making (a part of) the source text invisible. While this problem is apparent on tablets, it is even more problematic on smartphones with even smaller screens. Working on a translation on the go using a tablet of smartphone therefore does not offer a seamless, flawless, or productive experience just yet.

Another problem is that rendering the translation environment on a tablet or smartphone requires considerable computing resources on some devices. So in order to make full use of an online CAT tool, users need to have a powerful tablet or smartphone that can execute scripts and render style sheets quickly to realize a productivity gain.

That brings us to the question of whether online CAT tools can fulfil the needs of professional translators. Basically, the answer is yes. Online CAT tools often work well on desktops. However, they are currently an online variant on computer-aided translation tools. That does not mean that they are fully fledged to become smart device-based translation tools (SAT). The current generation of browser-based CAT tools is perfect to use with laptops while one is on the go, but in order to benefit from their full potential for smartphones and tablets they still need to be more adapted to these devices. The future of CAT tools is in our hands, but it still need to be adapted to our fingers.

Files, Files Everywhere: The Subtle Power of Translation Alignment

Files, Files Everywhere: The Subtle Power of Translation Alignment

Reading Time: 3 minutes

Here’s the basic scenario: you have the translated versions of your documents, but the translation wasn’t performed in a CAT tool and you have to build a translation memory because these documents need to be updated or changed across the languages, you want to retain the existing elements, style and terminology, and you have integrated CAT technology in your processes in the meantime. The solution is a neat piece of language engineering called translation alignment.

Translation alignment is a native feature of most productivity tools for computer-assisted translation, but its application in real life is limited to very specific situations, so even the language professionals rarely have an opportunity to use it. However, these situations do happen once in while and when they do, alignment usually comes as a trusty solution for process optimization. We will take a look at two actual cases to show you what exactly it does.

Example No. 1: A simple case

Project outline:

Three Word documents previously translated to one language, totaling 6000 unweighted words. Two new documents totaling around 2500 words that feature certain elements of the existing files and need to follow the existing style and terminology.

Project execution:

Since the translated documents were properly formatted and there were no layout issues, the alignment process was completed almost instantly. The software was able to segmentize the source files and we matched the translated segments, with some minor tweaking of segmentation. We then built a translation memory from those matched segments and added the new files to the project.

The result:

Thanks to the created translation assets, the final wordcount of the new content was around 1500 and our linguists were able to produce translation in accordance with the previously established style and terminology. The assets were preserved for use on future projects.

Example No.2: An extreme case of multilingual alignment

Project outline:

In one of our projects we had to develop translation assets in four language pairs, totaling roughly 30k words per language. The source materials were expanded with new content totaling about 20k words unweighted and the language assets had to be developed both to retain the existing style and terminology solution and to help the client switch to a new CAT platform.

Project execution:

Unfortunately, there was no workaround for ploughing through dozens of files, but once we organized the materials we could proceed to the alignment phase. Since these files were localized and some parts were even transcreated to match the target cultures, which also included changes in layout and differences in content, we knew that alignment was not going to be fully automated.

This is why native linguists in these languages performed the translation alignment and communicated with the client and the content producer during this phase. While this slowed the process a bit, it ultimately yielded the best results possible.

We then exported the created translation memory in the cross-platform TMXformat that allowed use in different CAT tools and the alignment phase was finished.

The result:

With the TM applied, the weighted volume of new content was around 7k words. Our linguists localized the new materials in accordance with the existing conventions in the new CAT platform and the translation assets were saved for future use.

Wrap up

In both cases, translation alignment enabled us to reduce the volume of the new content for translation and localization and ensure stylistic and lexical consistencywith the previously translated materials. It also provided an additional, real-time quality control and helped our linguists produce a better translation in less time.

Translation alignment is not an everyday operation, but it is good to know that when it is called to deliver the goods, this is exactly what it does.

Reference: https://bit.ly/2p5aYr0