Tag: CAT Tools

How to become a localization project manager

How to become a localization project manager

Excerpts from an article with the same title, written by Olga Melnikova in Multilingual Magazine.  Olga Melnikova is a project manager at Moravia and an adjunct professor at the Middlebury Institute of International Studies. She has ten years of experience in the language industry. She holds an MA in translation and localization management and two degrees in language studies.

I decided to talk to people who have been in the industry for a while, who have seen it evolve and know where it’s going. My main question was: what should a person do to start a localization project manager career? I interviewed several experts who shared their vision and perspectives — academics, industry professionals and recruiters. I spoke with Mimi Moore, account manager at Anzu Global, a recruiting company for the localization industry; Tucker Johnson, managing director of Nimdzi Insights; Max Troyer, translation and localization management program coordinator at MIIS, and Jon Ritzdorf, senior solution architect at Moravia and an adjunct professor at the University of Maryland and at MIIS. All of them are industry veterans and have extensive knowledge and understanding of its processes.

Why localization project management?

The first question is: Why localization project management? Why is this considered a move upwards compared to the work of linguists who are the industry lifeblood? According to Renato Beninatto and Tucker Johnson’s The General Theory of the Translation Company, “project
management is the most crucial function of the LSP. Project management has the potential to most powerfully impact an LSP’s ability to add value to the language services value chain.” “Project managers are absolutely the core function in a localization company,” said Johnson. “It is important to keep in mind that language services providers do not sell translation, they sell services. Project managers are responsible for coordinating and managing all of the resources that need to be coordinated in order to deliver to the client: they are managing time, money, people and technology.


Nine times out of ten, Johnson added, the project manager is the face of the company to the client. “Face-to-face contact and building the relationship are extremely important.” This is why The General Theory of the Translation Company regards project management to be one of the core functions of any language service provider (LSP). This in no way undermines the value of all the other industry players, especially
linguists who do the actual translation work. However, the industry cannot do without PMs because “total value is much higher than the original translations. This added value is at the heart of the language services industry.” This is why clients are happy to pay higher prices to work with massive multiple services providers instead of working directly with translators.

Who are they?

The next question is, how have current project managers become project managers? “From the beginning, when the industry started 20 years
ago, there were no specialized training programs for project managers,” Troyer recounted. “So there were two ways. One is you were a translator, but wanted to do something else — become an editor, for example, or start to manage translators. The other route was people working in a business that goes global. So there were two types of people who would become project managers — former translators or people who were assigned localization as a job task.”

According to Ritzdorf, this is still the case in many companies. “I am working with project managers from three prospective clients right now, all of whom do not have a localization degree and are all in localization positions. Did they end up there because they wanted to? Maybe not. They did not end up there because they said ‘Wow, I really want to become a head of localization.’ They just ended up there by accident, like a lot of people do.”

“There are a lot of people who work in a company and who have never heard of localization, but guess what? It is their job now to do localization, and they have to figure it out all by themselves,” Moore confirmed. “When the company decides to go international, they have to find somebody to manage that,” said Ritzdorf.

Regionalization


The first to mention regionalization was Ritzdorf, and then other interviewees confrmed it exists. Ritzdorf lives on the East Coast of the
United States, but comes to the West Coast to teach at MIIS, so he sees the differences. “There are areas where localization is a thing, which means when you walk into a company, they actually know about localization. Since there are enough people who understand what localization is, they want someone with a background in it.” Silicon Valley is a great example, said Ritzdorf. MIIS is close; there is a

localization community that includes organizations like Women in Localization; and there are networking events like IMUG. “People live and
breathe localization. However, there is a totally different culture in other regions, which is very fragmented. There are tons of little companies in other parts of the US, and the situation there is different. If I am a small LSP owner in Wisconsin or Ohio, what are my chances of finding someone with a degree or experience to fill a localization position for a project manager? Extremely low. This is why I may hire a candidate who has an undergraduate degree in French literature, for example. Or in linguistics, languages — at least something.”

The recruiters’ perspective


Nimdzi Insights conducted an interesting study about hiring criteria for localization project manager positions (Figure 1). Some 75 respondents (both LSPs and clients) were asked how important on a scale of 1 to 5 a variety of qualifications are for project management positions. Te responses show a few trends. Top priorities for clients are previous localization experience and a college degree, followed by years of experience and proficiency in more than one language. Top criteria for LSPs are reputation and a college degree, also followed
by experience and proficiency in more than one language.

Moore said that when clients want to hire a localization project manager, the skills they are looking for are familiarity with computer assisted translation (CAT) tools “and an understanding of issues that can arise during localization — like quality issues, for example. Compared to
previous years, more technical skills are required by both clients and vendors: CAT tools, WorldServer, machine translation knowledge, sometimes WordPress or basic engineering. When I started, they were nice-to-haves, but certainly not mandatory.”

Technical skill is not enough, however. “Both hard and soft skills are important. You need hard skills because the industry has become a lot more technical as far as software, tools and automation are concerned. You need soft skills to deal with external and internal stakeholders, and one of the main things is working under pressure because you are juggling so many things.

Moore also mentioned some red flags that would cause Anzu not to hire a candidate. “Sometimes an applicant does not demonstrate good English skills in phone interviews. Having good communication skills is important for a client-facing position. Also, people sometimes exaggerate their skills or experience. Another red flag is if the person has a bad track record (if they change jobs every nine months, for example).” ‘

Anzu often hires for project management contract positions in large companies. “Clients usually come to us when they need a steady stream of contractors (three or six months), then in three or six months there will be other contractors. Te positions are usually project managers or testers. If you already work fulltime, a contract position may not be that attractive. However, if you are a newcomer or have just graduated, and you want to get some experience, then it is a great opportunity. You would spend three, six or 12 months at a company, and it is a very good line on the résumé.”

Do you need a localization degree? 

There is no firm answer to the question of whether or not you need a degree. If you don’t know what you should do, it can certainly help. Troyer discussed how the localization program at MIIS has evolved to ft current real-world pressures. “The program was first started in 2004, and it started small. We were first giving CAT tools, localization project management and software localization courses. This is
the core you need to become a project manager. Ten the program evolved and we introduced the introduction and then advanced levels to many courses. There are currently four or five courses focusing on translation
technology.” Recent additions to the curriculum include advanced JavaScript classes, advanced project management and program management. Natural language processing and computational linguistics will be added down the road. “The industry is driving this move because students will need skills to go in and localize Siri into many languages,” said Troyer.

The program at MIIS is a two-year master’s. It can be reduced to one year for those who already have experience. There are other degrees
available, as well as certification programs offered by institutions such as the University of Washington and The Localization Institute.

Moore said that though a localization degree is not a must, it has a distinct advantage. A lot of students have internships that give them experience. They also know tools, which makes their résumés better fit clients’ job descriptions.

However, both Troyer and Ritzdorf said you don’t necessarily need a degree. “If you have passion for languages and technology, you can get the training on your own,” said Troyer. “Just teach yourself these skills, network on your own and try to break into the industry.”

The future of localization project management

Automation, artificial intelligence and machine learning are affecting all industries, and localization is not an exception. However, all the interviewees forecast that there will be more localization jobs in the future.

According to Johnson, there is high project management turnover on the vendor side because if a person is a good manager, they never stay in this position for more than five years. “After that, they either get a job on the client’s side to make twice as much money and have a much easier job, or their LSP has to promote them to senior positions such as group manager or program director.”

“There is a huge opportunity to stop doing things that are annoying,” said Troyer. “Automation will let professionals work on the human side
of things and let the machines run 
day-to-day tasks. Letting the machine send files back and forth will allow humans to spend more time looking at texts and thinking about what questions a translator can ask. This will give them more time for building a personal relationship with the client. We are taking these innovations into consideration for the curriculum, and I often spend time during classes asking, ‘How can you automate this?’”

Moore stated that “we have seen automation change workflows over the last ten years and reduce the project manager’s workload, with files being automatically moved through each step in the localization process. Also, automation and machine translation go hand-in-hand to make the process faster, more efficient and cost-effective.”

Uberization of Translation by Jonckers

Uberization of Translation by Jonckers

WordsOnline Cloud Based Platform Explained…

Just over a year ago, Jonckers announced the launch of its unique Cloud based management platform WordsOnline. The concept evolved from working in partnership with eCommerce customers, processing over 30 million words each month. Jonckers knew that faster time to market is key for sectors such as retail to get products and messages to their audience. They needed to keep up with this demand and build on their speedy solutions.

Jonckers identified that when dealing with higher volumes, the traditional batch and project methodology for processing translation was not as effective. Waiting weeks for large volume deliveries, arranging thousands of files to allocate to multiple linguists and keeping trackers up to date was taking its toll! Quality Assurance checks were also risking on time deliveries – the allocated batches to linguists were simply too large and timescales too long to manage QA within the timeframes.

It was clear a paradigm shift was needed. Jonckers conclusion: to develop a technology powered continuous delivery solution.

What is WordsOnline?

It’s a state of the art, cloud based TMS (Translation Management System) accommodating both the traditional localization workflow (project based) and the continuous delivery model.

What is a continuous delivery model?

It is a model without handoffs or handbacks. Through API, WordsOnline can sync with the customers’ system and downloads the content to be translated into the Jonckers powered database. That content is then split into small set of strings (defined on a case per case basis), made immediately available to edit and translate online. It is based on the Uber business model of fast, efficient supply and demand.
Jonckers’ resourcing team ensures premium resource capacity to guarantee content is continuously processed.

What type of content does WordsOnline process?

The purpose of the WordsOnline platform is fast-turnaround. The content processed so far by this impressive system is mostly large scale documentation, product descriptions, MT training material. However, the platform has been designed to process and deliver on all file and content types. Its non-discriminate programming has been developed specifically to be adaptable to any volume, language, time-frame and file format.

What are the key advantages of using WordsOnline?

• Faster turn-around time – Jonckers are able to process massive amounts of data that after translation will be pushed to review and back to the customer, in a continuous cycle.

• Price – WordsOnline applies TM, then Jonckers’ NMT engine or the customer’s engine if preferred. The volumes processed allow a more attractive and cost effective price point.

• Control –Project Managers can monitor the volume of words being processed, translated, reviewed and pushed back to the customer’s system. There are several other features which also allow rating of resource and analytics for a comprehensive overview of every job.

What are the key features of WordsOnline?

WordOnline linguist database interface includes a ratings platform so clients can monitor the delivery and quality of resources:

The live Dashboard interface allows clients to follow the progress of the content, performance of the MT engine, stats etc…

In short, the process is completely ‘Uberized’, Jonckers is making translation as simple as upload your files… track the progress… receive final translation delivery! Its as simple as that.

Reference: https://bit.ly/2HnoGjF

Exclusive Look Inside MemoQ Zen

Exclusive Look Inside MemoQ Zen



MemoQ launched a beta version for MemoQ Zen, a new online CAT tool. MemoQ Zen brings you the joy of translation, without the hassle. Experience the benefits of an advanced CAT tool, delivered to your browser in a simple and clean interface. You can get the early access through this link and adding your email address. Then, MemoQ’s team will activate your email address.

Note: preferably to use gmail account.  

These are exclusive screenshots from inside MemoQ Zen, as our blog got an early access:

Once the user logs in, this home page appears:

Clicking on adding new job will lead to these details:

You can upload documents from your computer or adding files from your Google Drive. The second option needs access to your drive. After choosing files to be uploaded, you’ll complete the required details for adding new jobs.

In working days field, MemoQ Zen excludes Sundays and Saturdays from the total workdays. This option helps in planing the actual days required to get the task done. After uploading the files and adding the details, a new job will be created in your job board.

Clicking on view statistics will lead to viewing the analysis report. Unfortunately, it can’t be saved.

Clicking on translate will lead to opening an online editor for the CAT tool.

TM and TB matches will be viewed on the right pane. Other regular options such as copying tags, join segments, and concordance search are there. Previewing mode can be enabled as well. Unfortunately, copying source to target isn’t available.

QA errors alerts appear after confirming each segments. After clicking on the alert, the error will appear like this. You can check ignore, in case it is a false error.

While translating, the progress is updating in the main view.

Clicking on fetch will download the target file (clean) to your computer. TMs and TBs aren’t available to upload, add, create or even download yet.

Clicking on done will mark the job as completed.

That’s it! Easy tool and to the point with clean UI and direct options. Although it still need development to meet the industry requirements i.e adding TMs and TBs, etc. But, it’s a good start, and as MemoQ Zen website states it:

We created memoQ Zen to prove that an advanced CAT tool doesn’t need to be complicated. It is built on the same memoQ technology that is used by hundreds of companies and thousands of translators every day.

We are releasing it as a limited beta because we want to listen to you from day one. As a gesture, it will also stay free as long as the beta phase lasts.

MemoQ’s First Release in 2018: MemoQ 8.4

MemoQ’s First Release in 2018: MemoQ 8.4

Kilgary released its MemoQ 8.4, its first release for 2018. Improvements come in five main areas: user experience, terminology, filters in memoQ, performance, and server workflows. Read on for details:

1- User Experience 

A- Customer Insights Program

The memoQ Customer Insights program will feature two major initiatives:

Usage Data Collection: When you work with memoQ, you are given the choice to enable sending data about how you use the software. Not all types of data will be collected. For more details, check here: https://goo.gl/fgppMh

The Design Lab: A loosely knit community where you can share your insights, opinions and knowledge. In exchange, we will evolve memoQ to be a user-friendly tool that meets your needs and solves your problems. For more details and how to join: https://goo.gl/dbHHeD

B- Comments in online projects

We have re-worked the way comments work in online projects. Now, project managers can delete any comments anywhere. And, non PM users can only delete their own comments. Also, users can edit their own comments only.

C- Task Tracker Progress Messages

In memoQ 8.4, Task Tracker progress messages are shown more consistently. From now on, the Task Tracker will display proper progress messages whenever TMs and TBs are exported. When you export a TM or TB, the message “In progress…” will be displayed as soon as the export begins, and “Done.” when the export completes.

In addition, you will be able to open the location where the export was saved by using the Open folder icon.

2- Terminology

A- Import and export term bases with images

With memoQ 8.4, you can now import and export term bases with images.

B- Forbidden terms in the spotlight

MemoQ 8.4 adds new functionality to work with forbidden terms more effectively and -transparently. It will be marked in the term editor for easy identification. It will be highlighted in red for exported and imported term bases.

C- Filters & QA settings

MemoQ 8.4 features small improvements that will facilitate the way you work with terminology while boosting efficiency. You can now determine which of the term bases assigned to the project you want to use for quality assurance in a specific project.

D- More effective stop word lists

MemoQ 8.4 improves stop word list functionality to make term extraction sessions more productive. By improving your stop word lists you can reduce the number of term candidates you need to process in a term extraction session.

E- Filter filed in term extraction

MemoQ 8.4 introduces a more user-friendly filter field on the term extraction screen featuring the history of the term extraction’s session.

F- Smart search settings in QTerm

From now on, when you log into QTerm, you will see the same settings you used the last time on the search page (term bases to search, view, languages, term matching). This is particularly useful if you typically use QTerm for term lookup in a specific language combination and/or with specific term bases.

G- Entry relationships in QTerm

If you establish a symmetrical (homonym, synonym, antonym, cohyponym) or an anti-symmetrical (hyponym, hypernym) entry relationship in one entry with another, the corresponding relationship is also created in the other entry.

H- Easy Term Search

MemoQ 8.4 now offers memoQWeb external users simple and easy access to QTerm term bases for lookup.

I- Filtering Options

The “Begins with” filter condition and search option has been revamped and it now features a more user-friendly term matching interface.

3- Performance

A- Improvements in responsiveness​

When you download memoQ 8.4, you will experience performance improvements in the following areas:
  • Opening the memoQ dashboard,
  • Opening projects,
  • Opening translation documents,
  • Scrolling through resources,
  • Faster rendering of various screens.
Note: The degree of improvements in performance you experience depends on your hardware configuration.

B- MemoQ server back-up

With memoQ 8.4, backing up your server should be faster. We have improved the performance of this task by decreasing back-up time by up to 50%.

Note: The improvement in backup duration may not be significant for memoQ Servers running on SSD drives.

4- Document Import and Export

A- Import filter for subtitles and dubbing script

The new import filter in memoQ 8.4 can handle two subtitle formats:

  • .srt files
  • custom-made .xlsx.

The preview displaying live video will be a plugin based on Preview SDK.

B- ZIP Filter

The new filter offers a generic option for handling ZIP packages. It will display the files of the archive as embedded documents. It will also be possible to import only some of them.

5- Server-to-server Workflows

A- Lookup on Enterprise TM

Until now, memoQ servers around the world resemble big powerful giants that are unable of “talking to each other”. This is now going to change.
MemoQ is investing effort in developing this new technology that will add significant value to customers using the following workflows:
  • Client + Vendor
  • Making use of several memoQ servers.

The projects created from packages now have direct access to the parent TMs. It is done through the child server, so firewalls can be configured to let the traffic through. Project Managers can deliver with one click.

Edit Distance in Translation Industry

Edit Distance in Translation Industry

In computational linguistics, edit distance or Levenshtein distance, is a way of quantifying how dissimilar two strings (e.g., words) are to one another by counting the minimum number of operations required to transform one string into the other.  The edit distance between (a, b) is the minimum-weight series of edit operations that transforms a into b. One of the simplest sets of edit operations is that defined by Levenshtein in 1966 which are:

1- Insertion.

2- Deletion

3- Substitution.

In Levenshtein’s original definition, each of these operations has unit cost (except that substitution of a character by itself has zero cost), so the Levenshtein distance is equal to the minimum number of operations required to transform a to b.

For example, the Levenshtein distance between “kitten” and “sitting” is 3. A minimal edit script that transforms the former into the latter is:

  • kitten – sitten (substitution of “s” for “k”).
  • sitten –  sittin (substitution of “i” for “e”).
  • sittin –  sitting (insertion of “g” at the end).

What are the application of edit distance in translation industry?

1- Spell Checkers

Edit distance is applied where automatic spelling correction can determine candidate corrections for a misspelled word by selecting words from a dictionary that have a low distance to the word in question.

2- Machine Translation Evaluation and Post Editing

Edit distance can be used to compare a postedited file to the machine translated output that was the starting point for the postediting. When you calculate the edit distance, you are calculating the “effort” that the posteditor made to improve the quality of the machine translation to a certain level. Starting from the source content and same MT output, if you perform a light postediting and a full postediting, the edit distance for each task will be different, and the human quality level is expected to have a higher edit distance, because more changes are needed. This means that you are measuring light and full postediting using the edit distance.

Therefore, the edit distance is a kind of “word count” measure of the effort, similar in a way to the word count used to quantify the work of translators throughout the localization industry. It also helps in evaluating the quality of MT engine by comparing the raw MT to the post edited version by a human translator.

3- Fuzzy Match

In translation memories, edit distance is the technique of finding strings that match a pattern approximately (rather than exactly). Translation memories provide suggestions to translators, and fuzzy matches are used to measure the effort made to improve those suggestions.

LookAhead Feature – Towards Faster Translation Results

LookAhead Feature – Towards Faster Translation Results

 

 

To facilitate your work on SDL Trados Studio 2017 SR1, SDL powered it with LookAhead feature. LookAhead is an in-memory lookup and retrieval mechanism which ensures that your translation search results are displayed fast when you activate a segment for translation. LookAhead technology radically improves the retrieval speed of TM search results, especially for long or complex source text. Once your source text is loaded in SDL Trados Studio , the application starts matching source text strings against the available translation resources (TMs, termbases or machine translation) in the background for the next two segments after the current one. As a result, you are instantly provided with translation hits for each segment that has matching translation results.

How to enable LookAhead?

  1. Go to File, and select Options.
  2. In the Options dialog, in the navigation tree, expand Editor.
  3. Select Automation.
  4. Under Translation Memory, select the Enable LookAhead checkbox.

How to Cut Localization Costs with Translation Technology

How to Cut Localization Costs with Translation Technology

What is translation technology?

Translation technologies are sets of software tools designed to process translation materials and help linguists in their everyday tasks. They are divided in three main subcategories:

Machine Translation (MT)

Translation tasks are performed by machines (computers) either on the basis of statistical models (MT engines execute translation tasks on the basis of accumulated translated materials) or neural models (MT engines are based on artificial intelligence). The computer-translated output is edited by professional human linguists through the process of postediting that may be more or less demanding depending on language combinations and the complexity of materials, as well as the volume of content.

Computer-Aided Translation (CAT)

Computer-aided or computer-assisted translation is performed by professional human translators who use specific CAT or productivity software tools to optimize their process and increase their output.

Providing a perfect combination of technological advantages and human expertise, CAT software packages are the staple tools of the language industry. CAT tools are essentially advanced text editors that break the source content into segments, and split the screen into source and target fields which in and of itself makes the translator’s job easier. However, they also include an array of advanced features that enable the optimization of the translation/localization process, enhance the quality of output and save time and resources. For this reason, they are also called productivity tools.

Figure 1 – CAT software in use

The most important features of productivity tools include:

  • Translation Asset Management
  • Advanced grammar and spell checkers
  • Advanced source and target text search
  • Concordance search.

Standard CAT tools include Across Language ServerSDL Trados StudioSDL GroupShare, SDL PassolomemoQMemsource CloudWordfastTranslation Workspace and others, and they come both in forms of installed software and cloud solutions.

Quality Assurance (QA)

Quality assurance tools are used for various quality control checks during and after the translation/localization process. These tools use sophisticated algorithms to check spelling, consistency, general and project-specific style, code and layout integrity and more.

All productivity tools have built-in QA features, but there are also dedicated quality assurance tools such as Xbench and Verifika QA.

What is a translation asset?

We all know that information has value and the same holds true for translated information. This is why previously translated/localized and edited textual elements in a specific language pair are regarded as translation assets in the language industry – once translated/localized and approved, textual elements do not need to be translated again and no additional resources are spent. These elements that are created, managed and used with productivity tools include:

Translation Memories (TM)

Translation memories are segmented databases containing previously translated elements in a specific language pair that can be reused and recycled in further projects. Productivity software calculates the percentage of similarity between the new content for translation/localization and the existing segments that were previously translated, edited and proofread, and the linguist team is able to access this information, use it and adapt it where necessary. This percentage has a direct impact on costs associated with a translation/localization project and the time required for project completion, as the matching segments cost less and require less time for processing.

Figure 2 – Translation memory in use (aligned sample from English to German)

Translation memories are usually developed during the initial stages of a translation/localization project and they grow over time, progressively cutting localization costs and reducing the time required for project completion. However, translation memories require regular maintenance, i.e. cleaning for this very reason, as the original content may change and new terminology may be adopted.

In case when an approved translation of a document exists, but it was performed without productivity tools, translation memories can be produced through the process of alignment:

Figure 3 – Document alignment example

Source and target documents are broken into segments that are subsequently matched to produce a TM file that can be used for a project.

Termbases (TB)

Termbases or terminology bases (TB) are databases containing translations of specific terms in a specific language pair that provide assistance to the linguist team and assure lexical consistency throughout projects.

Termbases can be developed before the project, when specific terminology translations have been confirmed by all stakeholders (client, content producer, linguist), or during the project, as the terms are defined. They are particularly useful in the localization of medical devices, technical materials and software.

Glossaries

Unlike termbases, glossaries are monolingual documents explaining specific terminology in either source or target language. They provide further context to linguists and can be used for the development of terminology bases.

Benefits of Translation Technology

The primary purpose of all translation technology is the optimization and unification of the translation/localization process, as well as providing the technological infrastructure that facilitates work and full utilization of the expertise of professional human translators.

As we have already seen, translation memories, once developed, provide immediate price reduction (that varies depending on the source materials and the amount of matching segments, but may run up to 20% in the initial stages and it may only grow over time), but the long-term, more subtle benefits of the smart integration of translation technology are the ones that really make a difference and they include:

Human Knowledge with Digital Infrastructure

While it has a limited application, machine translation still does not yield satisfactory results that can be used for commercial purposes. All machine translations need to be postedited by professional linguists and this process is known to take more time and resources instead of less.

On the other hand, translation performed in productivity tools is performed by people, translation assets are checked and approved by people, specific terminology is developed in collaboration with the client, content producers, marketing managers, subject-field experts and all other stakeholders, eventually providing a perfect combination of human expertise, feel and creativity, and technological solutions.

Time Saving

Professional human linguists are able to produce more in less time. Productivity software, TMs, TBs and glossaries all reduce the valuable hours of research and translation, and enable linguists to perform their tasks in a timely manner, with technological infrastructure acting as a stylistic and lexical guide.

This eventually enables the timely release of a localized product/service, with all the necessary quality checks performed.

Consistent Quality Control

The use of translation technology itself represents real-time quality control, as linguists rely on previously proofread and quality-checked elements, and maintain the established style, terminology and quality used in previous translations.

Brand Message Consistency

Translation assets enable the consistent use of a particular tonestyle and intent of the brand in all translation/localization projects. This means that the specific features of a corporate message for a particular market/target group will remain intact even if the linguist team changes on future projects.

Code / Layout Integrity Preservation

Translation technology enables the preservation of features of the original content across translated/localized versions, regardless of whether the materials are intended for printing or online publishing.

Different solutions are developed for different purposes. For example, advanced cloud-based solutions for the localization of WordPress-powered websites enable full preservation of codes and other technical elements, save a lot of time and effort in advance and optimize complex multilingual localization projects.

Wrap-up

In a larger scheme of things, all these benefits eventually spell long-term cost/time savings and a leaner translation/localization process due to their preventive functions that, in addition to direct price reduction, provide consistencyquality control and preservation of the integrity of source materials.

Reference: https://goo.gl/r5kmCJ

Wordfast Releases Wordfast Pro 5.4 and Wordfast Anywhere 5.0

Wordfast Releases Wordfast Pro 5.4 and Wordfast Anywhere 5.0

Wordfast today released version 5.4 of its platform independent desktop tool, Wordfast Pro. Notable features and improvements include Adaptive Transcheck, a new Segment Changes report format, a new feedback proxy tool, and the ability to connect to Wordfast Anywhere TMs and glossaries. This latest feature puts the power of server-based TMs and glossaries into the hands of desktop users for free.

Wordfast also recently released Wordfast Anywhere 5.0 which includes a localized user interface (UI) in French and Spanish. The UI is ready to be translated to other languages with a collaborative translation page accessible through a user’s profile.

Wordfast will be showcasing the interconnectivity of Wordfast Pro and Wordfast Anywhere during its 4th annual user conference – Wordfast Forward – to take place on June 1-2, 2018 in Cascais, Portugal. For more details about the program, please see the dedicated conference page.

Reference: https://goo.gl/hstxKp

LingoHub: Mobile App Translation

LingoHub: Mobile App Translation

Lingohub offers one platform for developers and translators for software localization. With economical pricing plans and the option of trying the platform for free, Lingohub makes it easy to localize mobile or web application with seamless integration into the development process. Here is a quick tutorial on how to use Lingohub for mobile app translations.

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