Category: Translation Business

SDL Cracks Russian to English Neural Machine Translation

SDL Cracks Russian to English Neural Machine Translation

On 19 June 2018, SDL published a press release to announce that its next-generation SDL Neural Machine Translation (NMT) 2.0 has mastered Russian to English translation, one of the toughest linguistic Artificial Intelligence (AI) problems to date.

SDL NMT 2.0 outperformed all industry standards, setting a benchmark for Russian to English machine translation, with over 90% of the system’s output labelled as perfect by professional Russian-English translators. The new SDL NMT 2.0 Russian engine is being made available to enterprise customers via SDL Enterprise Translation Server (ETS), a secure NMT product, enabling organizations to translate large volumes of information into multiple languages.

“One of the toughest linguistic challenges facing the machine translation community has been overcome by our team,” said Adolfo Hernandez, CEO, SDL. “It was the Russian language that first inspired the science and research behind machine translation, and since then it has always been a major challenge for the community. SDL has deployed breakthrough research strategies to master these difficult languages, and support the global expansion of its enterprise customers. We have pushed the boundaries and raised the performance bar even higher, and we are now paving the way for leadership in other complex languages.

”The linguistic properties and intricacies of the Russian language relative to English make it particularly challenging for MT systems to model. Russian is a highly inflected language with different syntax, grammar, and word order compared to English. Given the complexities created by these differences between the Russian and English language, raising the translation quality has been an ongoing focus of the SDL Machine Learning R&D team.

“With over 15 years of research and innovation in machine translation, our scientists and engineers took up the challenge to bring Neural MT to the next level,” said Samad Echihabi, Head of Machine Learning R&D, SDL. “We have been evolving, optimizing and adapting our neural technology to deal with highly complex translation tasks such as Russian to English, with phenomenal results. A machine running SDL NMT 2.0 can now produce translations of Russian text virtually indistinguishable from what Russian-English bilingual humans can produce.”

SDL NMT 2.0 is optimized for both accuracy and fluency and provides a powerful paradigm to deal with morphologically rich languages. It has been designed to adapt to the quality and quantity of the data it is trained on leading to high learning efficiency. SDL NMT 2.0 is also developed with the enterprise in mind with a significant focus on translation production speed and user control via terminology support. This also adds another level of productivity to Language Services Providers, and SDL’s own translators will be first to get access and benefit from this development.

Powered by SDL NMT 2.0, SDL Enterprise Translation Server (ETS) transforms the way global enterprises understand, communicate, collaborate and do business enabling them to securely translate and deliver large volumes of content into one or more languages quickly. Offering total control and security of translation data, SDL ETS has been successfully used in the government sector as well for over a decade.

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Six takeaways from LocWorld 37 in Warsaw

Six takeaways from LocWorld 37 in Warsaw

Over the past weekend, Warsaw welcomed Localization World 37 which gathered over 380 language industry professionals. Here is what Nimdzi has gathered from conversations at this premiere industry conference.

1. A boom in data processing services

A new market has formed preparing data to train machine learning algorithms. Between Lionbridge, Pactera, appen, and Welocalize  – the leading LSPs that have staked a claim in this sector – the revenue from these services already exceeds USD 100 million.

Pactera calls it “AI Enablement Services”, Lionbridge and Welocalize have labelled it “Global services for Machine Intelligence”, and appen prefers the title, “data for machine learning enhanced by human touch.” What companies really do is a variety of human tasks at scale:

  • Audio transcription
  • Proofreading
  • Annotation
  • Dialogue management

Humans help to train voice assistants and chat bots, image-recognition programs, and whatever else the Silicon Valley disruptors decide to unleash upon the world. One prime example was performed at the beginning of this year when Lionbridge recorded thousands of children pronouncing scripted phrases for a child-voice recognition engine.

Machine learning and AI are the second biggest areas for venture investment, according to dealroom.co. According to the International Data Corporation’s (IDC) forecast, this is likely to  quadruple in the next 5 years, from USD 12 billion in 2017 to USD 57.6 billion. Companies will need lots of accurate data to train their AI, hence there is significant business opportunity in data cleaning. Compared to flash platforms like Clickworker and Future Eight, LSPs have a broader human resource management competence and can compete for a large slice of the market.

2. LSP AI: Separating fact from fantasy

Artificial intelligence was high on information at #Locworld 37, but apart from the advances in machine translation, nothing radically new was presented. If any LSPs use machine learning for linguist selection, ad-hoc workflow building, or predictive quality analytics, they didn’t show it.

On the other hand, everyone is chiming in to the new buzzword. In a virtual show of hands at the AI panel discussion, an overwhelming proportion of LSP representatives voted that they already use some AI in their business. That’s pure exaggeration to put it mildly.

3. Introducing Game Global

Locworld’s Game Localization Roundtable expanded this year into a fully-fledged sister conference – the Game Global Forum. The two-day event gathered just over 100 people, including teams from King.com, Electronic Arts, Square Enix, Ubisoft, Wooga, Zenimax / Bethesda, Sony, SEGA, Bluehole and other gaming companies.

We spoke to participants on the buying side who believe the content to be very relevant, and vendors were happy with pricing – for roughly EUR 500, they were able to network with the world’s leading game localization buyers. This is much more affordable than the EUR 3,300+ price tag for the rival IQPC Game QA and Localization Conference.

Given the success of Game Global and the continued operation of the Brand2Global event, it’s fair to assume there is room for more industry-specific localization conferences.

4. TMS-buying rampage

Virtually every client company we’ve spoken to at Locworld is looking for a new translation management system. Some were looking for their first solution while others were migrating from heavy systems to more lightweight cloud-based solutions. This trend has been picked up by language technology companies which brought a record number of salespeople and unveiled new offerings.

Every buyer talked about the need for integration as well as end-to-end automation, and shared the “unless there is an integration, I won’t buy” sentiment. Both TMS providers and custom development companies such as Spartan Software are fully booked and churning out new connectors until the end of the 2018.

5. Translation tech and LSPs gear up for media localization

Entrepreneurs following the news have noticed that all four of the year’s fastest organically-growing companies are in the business of media localization. Their success made ripples that reached the general language services crowd. LSP voiceover and subtitling studios are overloaded, and conventional CAT-tools will roll out media localization capabilities this year. MemoQ will have a subtitle editor with video preview, and a bigger set of features is planned to be released by GlobalLink.

These features will make it easier for traditional LSPs to hop on the departed train of media localization. However, LSP systems won’t compare to specialized software packages that are tailored to dubbing workflow, detecting and labeling individual characters who speak in videos, tagging images with metadata, and the like.

Reference: https://bit.ly/2JZpkSM

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England’s Top Judge Predicts ‘the End of Interpreters’

England’s Top Judge Predicts ‘the End of Interpreters’

The top judge in England and Wales has joined the machine translation debate. And he is not mincing his words. Speaking on “The Age of Reform” at the Sir Henry Brooke Annual Lecture on June 7, 2018, the Lord Chief Justice (LCJ) of England and Wales stated “I have little doubt that within a few years high quality simultaneous translation will be available and see the end of interpreters”.

The Lord Chief Justice is the Head of the Judiciary of England and Wales. He is also the President of the Courts of England and Wales and responsible for representing the views of the judiciary to Parliament and the Government.

In his speech, the LCJ, Ian Burnett, also described current-state online instant translation as “the technological equivalent of the steam-engine” and “artificial intelligence that is the transformative technology of our age.”

He acknowledged, however, that the current ambition of “HMCTS [HM Courts & Tribunals Service] and Government is more modest but nonetheless important. It is to bring our systems up to date and to take advantage of widely available technology.”

The comment made by Lord Burnett of Maldon, who occupies one of the most senior judicial positions in the U.K., has been met with disbelief by some, with a number of industry professionals posting comments in response to an article published online by the Law Society Gazette on June 8, 2018.

“I have little doubt that within a few years high quality simultaneous translation will be available and see the end of interpreters” — Lord Burnett of Maldon

One anonymous comment read “…I feel that the LCJ simply does not have the slightest understanding of what interpreters do, or the difficulties they face, in the real world.” Another contributor said that “it is astonishing and very seriously worrying that any member of the judiciary, let alone the LCJ, can seriously think that a computer will in the foreseeable future, or even ever, be able accurately to translate the fine nuances of a legal argument or evidence.”

Interpretation services for the HMCTS are currently provided under a four-year MoJ contract worth GBP 232.4m (USD 289m), which thebigword took over from Capita TI in late 2016.

Slator reached out to language service provider (LSP) thebigword for comment, and CEO Larry Gould responded by agreeing on the one hand that “it is right to say that machine translation and AI are transforming the language sector, as they are many other parts of the economy.”

He continued in explaining that, “our experiences have taught us that AI still has a long way to go in being able to deliver the subtleties and nuances of language. At the moment these can be lost very quickly with machine translation, and this could have a big impact on access to justice and law enforcement if it is rushed out too fast.”

“(…) this could have a big impact on access to justice and law enforcement if it is rushed out too fast” — Larry Gould, CEO, thebigword

For an interpreter’s perspective, Slator also contacted Dr Jonathan Downie PhD, AITI, whose PhD was on client expectations of interpreters. Downie told us that “The Lord Chief Justice has done all interpreters a favour by raising the issue of machine interpreting and showing how persuasive the PR around it has been. He is also right that legal Interpreting is ripe for technological change.”

“We do have to remember however that so far the lab results of machine interpreting have been shown to be irrelevant to real-life. The Tencent fiasco with machine interpreting at the Boao Forum this year taught us that lesson, as has almost every public trial of the technology outside of basic conversations.”

“We do have to remember however that so far the lab results of machine interpreting have been shown to be irrelevant to real-life” — Dr Jonathan Downie PhD, AITI

“It may be meaningful that my challenge to machine interpreting companies to put their technology on trial at a realistic conference has been met with deafening silence. Could it be that they are not as convinced by their PR and marketing as the Lord Chief Justice seems to be?”

Reference: https://bit.ly/2JIotc2

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The Stunning Variety of Job Titles in the Language Industry

The Stunning Variety of Job Titles in the Language Industry

Slator published an amazing report about the job titles used in the language industry in LinkedIn. They have identified over 600 unique titles…and counting! An impressive total for what is often referred to as a niche industry. Here they ask What does it all mean?

Project Management

While Transcreation and Localization indicate that a Project Manager is operating within the language industry (rather than in Software or Construction, for example), the AssociateSenior and Principal prefaces are indicative of the job level. Hyphens also seem to be en vogue on LinkedIn, and used mainly to denote the specific customer segment, as in the case of “Project Manager – Life Sciences”. We also see Language Manager or Translation Manager, although these seem to be more in use when a Project Manager is responsible for an inhouse linguistic team.

Coordinator and Manager appear to be used somewhat interchangeably across the industry, but where one company uses both titles, Manager is usually more senior. So how do you tell where a Project Coordinator ends and a Project Manager begins, especially if the lines are blurred further with the Associate, Principal or Senior modifiers?

Some companies reserve the Project Manager title for those who are customer facing, while Coordinators might remain more internally focused (e.g. performing administrative and linguist-related tasks but not interfacing with the customers). To make this same distinction, some LSPs are increasingly using Customer Success Manager, a title that presumably has its origin among Silicon Valley startups.

The Program Manager title is also emerging as a mid to senior job title in Project Management on technology and other large accounts, with an element of people or portfolio management involved as well. In other companies, Account Manager can also be used to describe a similar role within Project Management, specifically customer focused, and often also involving a degree of people or performance management.

Confusingly, Account Managers in many LSPs are part of the Sales function, with revenue / retention targets attached. Likewise, the Customer Success Manager job title is broad and ambiguous since it can also apply to both Sales and Project Management staff.

Sales and Business Development

Across the Sales function, we find a similar array of job titles: from Business Development Manager and Senior Localization Strategy Consultant to Strategic Account Executive and Vice President of Sales. Preferences range from specific to vague on a spectrum of transparency, with the slightly softer BD title being more favored among the frontline Sales staff in LSPs. We also note the C-Suite title Chief Revenue Officerentering the arena as someone responsible for the revenue generating activities of Marketing and Sales teams, and offer a special mention to the Bid Managers and Pre-Sales teams.

Solutions

At the center of the Sales, Operations and Technology Venn diagram are the Solutions teams, striving to solve the most complex of customer and prospective client “puzzles”. From the generic Solutions ArchitectDirector of Client Solutions, Solutions Consulting and Director of Technology Solutions, to the more specific Cloud Solutions Architect or Solutions Manager for Machine Intelligence, these individuals help make the promises of Sales a reality for the customer by enabling the Operations teams to deliver the right product in the right way.

Vendor Management

It’s a similar state of affairs across the Vendor Management function. Here we find Global Procurement Directors, Supplier Relations Managers, Area Sourcing Managers, Supply Chain Managers and Talent Program Managers, all dedicated to the managing the pool of linguists and other linguistic subcontractors within an LSP.

Linguists

Arguably the lifeblood of the language industry, but not every LSP has them. Companies that do have a team of linguists inhouse hire for roles such as Medical and Legal InterpreterSenior EditorTechnical TranslatorInhouse Translator/Reviser and French Translator-Subtitler, with some multi-tasking as Translator / IT Manager and Account Manager / Translator.

Tech etc.

The Technology function(s) in LSPs can be a bit of a catch-all for employees working on IT, software development and functional QA activities, within many coming from outside the industry originally. The extent to which an LSP develops its own solutions inhouse will determine the technicality of the job titles assigned to Technology staff, and some language industry old-timers may be hard-pressed to tell their Junior Full Stack Software Developer from their Senior UX Designer and their Product Managers from their Project Manager. Other Tech-type job roles include QA Automation EngineerAssociate Customer Support EngineerChief Information Officer, and Sound Engineer.

Back-Office

Perhaps the most standardized and least localization-specific area of the language industry, the back-office and shared-services functions house the likes of marketing, payroll, HR, finance, and accounting professionals. Behind the scenes here can be found HR SpecialistsHR Generalists (and everything in between), your friendly Director of Talent Acquisition as well as Financial Accounting Managers, Group Financial Controllers, and not forgetting General Counsel.

Why The Variety?

There are many elements at play in explaining the mindblowing variety of job titles found in the language industry. Some of the key factors include:

  • Geography – While variants of the VP title are seen more in the US, Asia tends to favour Area or Country Managers. By contrast, Directors and Heads of are most likely to be found in Europe.
  • Customer Base – Some companies tap into the idea of using job titles strategically to mirror the language used by their clients, hence Customer Success Manager in a Tech-focused LSP, or Principal Project Manager in one servicing a Financial customer base.
  • Organizational Design – Flatter organizations typically differentiate less between job levels while others design progressively more senior titles as a people management / motivational tool. Internally, an employee may achieve levels of progression (junior, senior or level 1, 2, 3 etc.), without the external facing job title having changed. This contributes to giving companies a….
  • Competitive Edge – Helpfully, job titles that are ambiguous are less understandable to those outside the business, which can make it harder for competitors to poach the best employees.
  • Creative License – Since LinkedIn profiles are normally owned by individuals, employees have a certain leave to embellish on their actual job titles.

In alongside the obvious and mundane, the vague and ambiguous are also some intriguing job titles: we spotted Traffic Coordinator, People Ops and Quality Rater to name just a few.

Reference: https://bit.ly/2JbQpl6

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2018 European Language Industry Survey Results

2018 European Language Industry Survey Results

GALA published the 2018 survey results for European Language Industry. In the preamble, it appears to be one of the most successful  surveys from its kind.

With 1285 responses from 55 countries, including many outside Europe, this 2018 edition of the European Language Industry survey is the most successful one since its start in 2013.

This report analyses European trends rather than those in individual countries. Significant differences between countries will be highlighted if the number of answers from those countries is sufficiently high to draw meaningful conclusions.

Objectives of This Survey

The objectives of the survey have not changed compared to previous editions. It was not set up to gather exact quantitative data but to establish the mood of the industry. As such it does not replace other local, regional or global surveys of the language industry but adds the important dimensions of perception and trust which largely determine the actions of industry stakeholders.

The questions concerning the market as well as the open questions regarding trends and concerns are identical to those in the previous editions in order to detect changes in prevailing opinions.

The survey results report covers many aspect in the language industry. We chose the below aspects to highlight on:

Certification Requirements 

Companies report an increase in certification requirements in 2017 and consequently adjust their expectations for 2018 upward. Although most responding companies expect the requirements to stay at the current level, 25% of them expect an increase. Nobody is expecting a decrease.


Security Requirements

According to the respondents, the real increase in security requirements exceeded even the 2017 expectations, which led them to further increase their expectations for 2018.

Operational Practices

Outsourcing remains a popular practice among language service companies, with 40% indicating that they want to increase this practice. Only 2% report a decrease. Even more popular is MT post-editing this year. 37% report an increase and an additional 17% indicate that they are starting this practice.

Crowdsourcing and offshoring, both often debated in language industry forums, remain slow starters. This year 5% of the companies report to start with crowdsourcing and 4% to increase their use of this practice. Offshoring has already a slightly higher penetration and 11% of the
companies report to increase this practice, compared to 5% in 2017. An additional 3% want to start with the practice.

Note: the graph above does not represent actual usage of the practices, but the level of their expected development, determined as follows: [start * 2] + [increase] – [stop * 2] – [decrease].

Technology

Machine Translation

We will remember 2018 as the year in which more than 50% of both the companies and the individual language professionals reported that they are using MT in one form or another.

The technology cannot yet be considered mainstream, because only 22% of the LSC’s and 19% of the individuals state that they are using it daily, but the number of companies and individuals that are not using it at all has dropped to respectively 31% and 38%.

This does not mean that MT users are enthusiastically embracing the technology, as the answers in the section about negative trends testify, but it is a strong indication that the market has accepted that machine translation is here to stay.

The survey results also show that using MT does not necessarily mean investing in MT. The most popular engine is still the free Google Translate. 52% of all respondents report that they are using the site, but we see a clear difference between the various categories of respondents. While more than 70% of the respondents in training institutes report that they are using the site, only 49% of the translation companies and 52% of the individual translators state the same.

CAT and Terminology Tools

This year’s results confirm the 2017 statement that the use of CAT tools is clearly more widespread in language service companies than in the individual professionals’ community. Less than 1% of the companies report that they are not using CAT tools, compared to 13% of the
individual language professionals.

This year the survey tried to ascertain the level of competition on the CAT market. The survey results indicate that this CAT landscape is becoming more complex, but they also show that the SDL/TRADOS product suite still has a leading position in terms of installed base,
with 67% of the respondents using one or more versions of the product (ranging from 56% of the training institutes to 79% of the translation companies).

MemoQ can currently be considered as the most serious contender, with approx. 40% penetration. The top 5 is completed with Memsource, Wordfast and Across, which all remain below the 30% installed base mark.

Not surprisingly, Multiterm (the terminology tool linked with the SDL/Trados suite) is the most popular terminology tool around – except for the basic Office-type tools that are used 50% more often than Multiterm, which itself is used 6 times more often than the next in line.

Translation Management Systems

The level of penetration of translation management systems in language service companies has not significantly changed compared to 2017, with 76% of the responding companies using some type of management system.

The most popular 3rd party system in this category is Plunet, followed by XTRF. SDLTMS on the other hand seems to be more often selected by training institutes and translation departments.

Recruitment and Training

Skill Level of  New-Master Level Graduates

The results below refer to training institutes, translation companies and translation departments (359 respondents).

A majority of these respondents rate all skills of new graduates as either sufficiently developed or very well developed. Translation tool skills score lowest, despite the stronger cooperation between universities and translation professionals, and the efforts made by translation tool
providers.

10 to 15% used the “not applicable” answer, which indicates that the person who completed the survey is not involved in recruitment and therefore was not comfortable giving an opinion.

Investment in Training or Professional Development

Which Type of Training Have You Organized or Attended in 2017?

The following chart presents the popularity of the various types of training across all respondent types.

Not surprisingly, the respondents representing training institutes, translation companies and translation departments report a higher than average number of trainings organised or followed. Given the importance of lifelong learning, the 15% respondents that did not organise or follow any training in 2017 can – and should – be considered as a wakeup call for the industry at large.

Return on Investment

Training institutions, translation companies and translation departments report a considerably higher impact of training on their performance than the individual professionals, which make up most of the respondents.

Trends for The Industry 

In this edition of the survey, the open question about trends that will dominate the industry has been split to allow the respondents to distinguish between positive and negative trends.

The fact that both language service companies and individual professionals see price pressure as a prevailing negative trend but at the same time expect a status quo on pricing indicates that they are fairly confident that they will be able to withstand the pressure.

Across the board, the increase of translation demand is the most often cited positive trend for 2018, with 16% of the respondents. Advances in technology in general (including CAT), machine translation, increased professionalism and a higher awareness by the market of the importance of language services complete the top 5. Interesting to note is that quite a few respondents, in particular individual professionals, expect that the lack of quality of machine translation can lead to an increased appreciation for the quality of human translation.

That same machine translation clearly remains the number 2 among the negative trends, almost always correlated with the factor price pressure. The traditional fear that machine translation opens the door to lower quality and more competition by lower qualified translators and translation companies remains strong.

The report also includes some insights. We chose the below insights to highlight on:

1-  Most European language service companies (LSCs) can be considered to be small.
2-  The number of individual language professionals that work exclusively as subcontractors decreases with growing revenue.

3-  Legal services remain undisputedly the most widely served type of customer for both respondent types; companies and individuals. 

4-  Machine Translation engines that require financial or time investment have difficulty to attract more than minority interest.

5-  Except for “client terms and conditions” and “insufficient demand”, language service companies score all challenges higher than individual professionals.

Conclusion

This 2018 edition of the European Language Industry survey reinforces the positive image that could already be seen in the 2017 results. Virtually all parameters point to higher confidence in the market, from expected sales levels, recruitment plans and investment intentions to the expectation that 2018 prices will be stable.

2018 is clearly the year of machine translation. This is the first year that more than half of the respondents declare that they are using the technology in one way or another. On the other hand, it is too soon to conclude that MT is now part of the translation reality, with only some
20% of the language service companies and independent language professionals reporting daily usage. Neural MT has clearly not yet brought the big change that the market is expecting.

Changes to the technology questions are giving us a better view of the actual use of CAT, MT and other technologies by the various categories of respondents. New questions about internships have brought us additional insights in the way that the market is looking upon this
important tool to bridge the gap between the universities and the professional world.

Reference: http://bit.ly/2HOJEpx

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Top 5 Reasons Why Enterprises Rely on Machine Translation for Global Expansion

Top 5 Reasons Why Enterprises Rely on Machine Translation for Global Expansion

SDL published a whitepaper regarding the reasons behind why enterprises rely on Machine Translation for global expansion. SDL stated the case in point in the introduction, which is language barriers between companies and their global customers stifle economic growth. In fact, forty-nine percent of executives say a language barrier has stood in the way of a major international business deal. Nearly two-thirds (64 percent) of those same executives say language barriers make it difficult to gain a foothold in international markets. Whether inside or outside your company, your global audiences prefer to read in their native languages. It speeds efficiency, increases receptivity and allows for easier processing of concepts. 

SDL stated this point as a solution to the aforementioned challenge:

To break the language barrier and expand your global and multilingual footprint, there are opportunities to leverage both human translation and machine translation.

Then, the paper compared between human translation and MT from the perspective of usage. For human translation, it is the best for content that is legally binding, as well as high value, branded content. However, human translation can be costly, can take weeks (or even months) to complete and can’t address all of the real-time needs of your business to serve multilingual prospects, partners and customers.

And regarding MT, it is fast becoming an essential complement to human translation efforts. It is well suited for use as part of a human translation process, but also solves high-volume and real-time content challenges that human translation cannot on its own, including the five that are the focus of this white paper.

First reason:  Online user activity and multilingual engagement

Whether it’s a web forum, blog, community content, customer review or a Wiki page, your online user-generated content (UGC) is a powerful tool for customer experience and can be a great opportunity to connect customers around your brand and products. These are rarely translated because the ever-fluctuating content requires real-time translation that is not possible with traditional translation options. However, this content is a valuable resource for resolving problems, providing information, building a brand and delivering a positive customer experience.

Machine translation provides a way for companies to quickly and affordably translate user reviews on e-commerce sites, comments on blogs or within online communities or forums, Wiki content and just about any other online UGC that helps provide support or information to your customers and prospects. While the translation isn’t perfect, its quality is sufficient for its primary purpose: information.

Second reason:  Global customer service and customer relationship management

The goal of any customer service department is to help customers find the right answer – and to stay off the phone. Phone support is typically expensive and inefficient for the company and can be frustrating for the customer. Today, customer service departments are working to enhance relationships with customers by offering support over as many self-service channels as possible, including knowledge base articles, email support and real-time chat.

However, due to its dynamic nature, this content often isn’t translated into different languages, making multilingual customer service agents required instead. Because of its real-time capabilities, capacity to handle large volumes of content and ability to lower costs, machine translation is an extremely attractive option for businesses with global customer support organizations.

There are two key online customer support areas that are strong candidates for machine translation:
• Real-time communication
• Knowledge base articles

Third reason:  International employee collaboration

Your employees are sharing information every day: proposals, product specification, designs, documents. In a multinational company, they’re likely native speakers of languages other than the one spoken at headquarters. While these employees may speak your language very
well, they most likely prefer to review complex concepts in their native languages. Reading in their native languages increases their mental
processing speed and allows them to work better and faster.

Human translation isn’t possible in this scenario because of the time-sensitivity inherent to internal collaboration. But internal knowledge sharing doesn’t need the kind of letter perfect translation that public-facing documents often do. For internal content sharing, machine translation can provide an understandable translation that will help employees transcend language barriers. In addition, by granting all employees access to a machine translation solution, they are able to access and quickly translate external information as well without sending it through a lengthy translation process or exposing it outside of your walls.

This level of multilingual information sharing and information access can dramatically improve internal communications and knowledge sharing, increase employee satisfaction and retention and drive innovation among your teams.

Forth reason:  Online security and protection of intellectual property

In an effort to be resourceful, your employees will likely seek out free translation methods like Google Translate or Microsoft Bing. These public, web-based machine translation tools are effective, but they allow your intellectual property to be mined to improve search results or for other needs. There is a simple test to determine if your company’s information is being submitted through public channels for translation: Simply have your IT department audit your firewalls to determine how much traffic is going to the IP addresses of online translation services. Many companies have been surprised by the volume of information going out of their organization this way.

This security hole can be plugged with a secure, enterprise-grade machine translation hosted on-premises or in a private cloud. With this type of solution, you can give employees a secure translation option for translation of documents, websites and more. And, of course, you’ll protect your valuable intellectual property by keeping it in-house, where it belongs.

Fifth reason:  Translation capacity and turnaround time for internal teams or agencies

Machine translation can improve the capacity and productivity of internal translation departments or language service providers (LSPs) by 30 percent or more and greatly reduces the cost of content translaton. Large enterprises that translate massive volumes have seen increases up to 300 percent in translation productivity when machine translation is used to generate the initial translation, which is then edited by skilled translators.

Here’s how it works: instead of starting with a raw document, translators start with a machine translation, which they review in a post-editing process. Translators edit and fine-tune the content for readability, accuracy and cultural sensitivity. By front-loading the process with a high-quality machine translation, translators are still able to provide high-quality content, but in a fraction of the time. 

Reference: https://bit.ly/2wXRQSt

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How machine learning can be used to break down language barriers

How machine learning can be used to break down language barriers

Machine learning has transformed major aspects of the modern world with great success. Self-driving cars, intelligent virtual assistants on smartphones, and cybersecurity automation are all examples of how far the technology has come.

But of all the applications of machine learning, few have the potential to so radically shape our economy as language translation. The content of language translation is the perfect model for machine learning to tackle. Language operates on a set of predictable rules, but with a degree of variation that makes it difficult for humans to interpret. Machine learning, on the other hand, can leverage repetition, pattern recognition, and vast databases to translate faster than humans can.

There are other compelling reasons that indicate language will be one of the most important applications of machine learning. To begin with, there are over 6,500 spoken languages in the world, and many of the more obscure ones are spoken by poorer demographics who are frequently isolated from the global economy. Removing language barriers through technology connects more communities to global marketplaces. More people speak Mandarin Chinese than any other language in the world, making China’s growing middle class is a prime market for U.S. companies if they can overcome the language barrier.

Let’s take a look at how machine learning is currently being applied to the language barrier problem, and how it might develop in the future.

Neural machine translation

Recently, language translation took an enormous leap forward with the emergence of a new machine translation technology called Neural Machine Translation (NMT). The emphasis should be on the “neural” component because the inner workings of the technology really do mimic the human mind. The architects behind NMT will tell you that they frequently struggle to understand how it comes to certain translations because of how quickly and accurately it delivers them.

“NMT can do what other machine translation methods have not done before – it achieves translation of entire sentences without losing meaning,” says Denis A. Gachot, CEO of SYSTRAN, a language translation technologies company. “This technology is of a caliber that deserves the attention of everyone in the field. It can translate at near-human levels of accuracy and can translate massive volumes of information exponentially faster than we can operate.”

The comparison to human translators is not a stretch anymore. Unlike the days of garbled Google Translate results, which continue to feed late night comedy sketches, NMT is producing results that rival those of humans. In fact, Systran’s Pure Neural Machine Translation product was preferred over human translators 41% of the time in one test.

Martin Volk, a professor at the Institute of Computational Linguistics at the University of Zurich, had this to say about neural machine translation in a 2017 Slator article:

“I think that as computing power inevitably increases, and neural learning mechanisms improve, machine translation quality will gradually approach the quality of a professional human translator over the coming two decades. There will be a point where in commercial translation there will no longer be a need for a professional human translator.”

Gisting to fluency

One telling metric to watch is gisting vs. fluency. Are the translations being produced communicating the gist of an idea, or fluently communicating details?

Previous iterations of language translation technology only achieved the level of gisting. These translations required extensive human support to be usable. NMT successfully pushes beyond gisting and communicates fluently. Now, with little to no human support, usable translations can be processed at the same level of quality as those produced by humans. Sometimes, the NMT translations are even superior.

Quality and accuracy are the main priorities of any translation effort. Any basic translation software can quickly spit out its best rendition of a body of text. To parse information correctly and deliver a fluent translation requires a whole different set of competencies. Volk also said, “Speed is not the key. We want to drill down on how information from sentences preceding and following the one being translated can be used to improve the translation.”

This opens up enormous possibilities for global commerce. Massive volumes of information traverse the globe every second, and quite a bit of that data needs to be translated into two or more languages. That is why successfully automating translation is so critical. Tasks like e-discovery, compliance, or any other business processes that rely on document accuracy can be accelerated exponentially with NMT.

Education, e-commerce, travel, diplomacy, and even international security work can be radically changed by the ability to communicate in your native language with people from around the globe.

Post language economy

Everywhere you look, language barriers are a speed check on global commerce. Whether that commerce involves government agencies approving business applications, customs checkpoints, massive document sharing, or e-commerce, fast and effective translation are essential.

If we look at language strictly as a means of sharing ideas and coordinating, it is somewhat inefficient. It is linear and has a lot of rules that make it difficult to use. Meaning can be obfuscated easily, and not everyone is equally proficient at using it. But the biggest drawback to language is simply that not everyone speaks the same one.

NMT has the potential to reduce and eventually eradicate that problem.

“You can think of NMT as part of your international go-to-market strategy,” writes Gachot. “In theory, the Internet erased geographical barriers and allowed players of all sizes from all places to compete in what we often call a ‘global economy,’ But we’re not all global competitors because not all of us can communicate in the 26 languages that have 50 million or more speakers. NMT removes language barriers, enabling new and existing players to be global communicators, and thus real global competitors. We’re living in the post-internet economy, and we’re stepping into the post-language economy.”

Machine learning has made substantial progress but has not yet cracked the code on language. It does have its shortcomings, namely when it faces slang, idioms, obscure dialects of prominent languages and creative or colorful writing. It shines, however, in the world of business, where jargon is defined and intentional. That in itself is a significant leap forward.

Reference: https://bit.ly/2Fwhuku

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GDPR. Understanding the Translation Journey

GDPR. Understanding the Translation Journey

“We only translate content into the languages of the EU, so we are covered with regards GDPR clauses relating to international transfers.”

Right? Wrong.

The GDPR imposes restrictions on the transfer of personal data outside the European Union (EU), to third-party countries or international organizations. While there are provisions that refer to your ability to do this with the appropriate safeguards in place, how confident are you that you’re not jeopardising GDPR-compliance with outdated translation processes?

Let’s consider the following:

  1. 85% of companies cannot identify whether they send personal information externally as part of their translation process.
  2. The translation process is complex – it isn’t a simple case of sending content from you to your translator. Translating one document alone into 10 languages involves 150 data exchanges (or ‘file handoffs’). Multiply this by dozens of documents and you have a complex task of co-ordinating thousands of highly-sensitive documents – some which may contain personal data.

With different file versions, translators, editors, complex graphics, subject matter experts and in country reviewers the truth is that content is flying back and forth around the world faster than we can imagine. Designed with speed of delivery and time to market in mind these workflows overlook the fact that partners might not share the same compliance credentials.

Where exactly is my data?

Given that we know email is not secure – let us think about what happens when you use a translation portal or an enterprise translation management system.

Once you’ve transferred the content for translation, the translation agency or provider downloads and processes that data on its premises before allocating the work to linguists and other teams (let’s hope these are in the EU and they are GDPR compliant).

Alternatively, the software you have used to share your content may process the data to come up with your Translation Memory leverage and spend – in which case better check your End User Licence Agreement to ensure you know where that processing (and backup) takes place.

After that has happened the content is distributed to the translators to work on. Even if all the languages you translate into are in the EU – are you SURE that your translators are physically located there too?

And what about your translation agency’s project management team? How exactly do they handle files that require Desktop Publishing or file engineering? Are these teams located onshore in the EU or offshore to control costs? If the latter what systems are they using, and how can you ensure no copies of your files are sitting in servers outside of your control?

These are just some of the questions you should be asking now to fully understand where your translation data is located.

What can I do?

If you haven’t already – now is the time to open a conversation with your partner about your data protection needs and what they are doing as a business to ensure compliance. They should be able to tell you exactly which borders your data crosses during the translation process, where it’s stored and what they’re doing to help with Translation Memory management. They should also provide you with a controlled environment that you can use across the entire translation supply chain, so that no data ever leaves the system.

Of course, there are many considerations to take into account when it comes to GDPR. But looking at the complexity of translating large volumes of content – are you still confident that your translation processes are secure?

Reference: https://bit.ly/2vmKKX5

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Europe’s New Privacy Regulation GDPR Is Changing How LSPs Handle Content

Europe’s New Privacy Regulation GDPR Is Changing How LSPs Handle Content

GDPR, the General Data Protection Regulation, is soon to be introduced across Europe, and is prompting language service providers (LSPs) to update policies and practices relating to their handling of all types of personal data.

The GDPR comes into effect on 25 May 2018 and supersedes the existing Data Protection Directive of 1995. It introduces some more stringent requirements on how the personal data of EU citizens are treated.

Specifically, LSPs must demonstrate that they are compliant in the way that they handle any type of personal data that at some point flows through their business. Personal data means any information by which a person can be identified, such as a name, location, photo, email address, bank details…the list goes on.

Therefore, LSPs need to ensure that all data, from employee records and supplier agreements to client contact information and content for translation, are handled appropriately.

What personal data do LSPs handle?

Aside from the actual content for translation, an LSP is likely to possess a vast array of personal data including Sales and Marketing data (prospective client details, mailing lists, etc.), existing client data (customer names, emails, POs, etc.), HR and Recruitment data (candidate and employee data including CVs, appraisals, addresses, etc.) and Supplier (freelance) data (bank details, contact details, performance data, CVs, etc.).

In this respect, the challenges that LSPs will face are not significantly different from most other service businesses, and there are lots of resources that outline the requirements and responsibilities for complying with GDPR. For example, the Europa website details some key points, and ICO (for the UK) has a self-assessment readiness toolkit for businesses.

What about content for translation?

Content that a client sends you for translation also may contain personal information. Some of these documents are easy enough to identify by their nature (such as birth, death, marriage certificates, HR records, and medical records), but personal data might be also considered to extend to the case where you receive an internal communication from a customer that includes a quote from the company CEO, for example.

Short-term challenges

It is important to be able to interpret what the GDPR means for LSPs generally, and for your business specifically. The impact of the regulation will become clearer over time, but it throws up some potentially crucial questions in the immediate, such as:

  • What the risks are for LSPs who continue to store personal data within translation memories and machine translation engines;
  • What the implications are for sharing personal data with suppliers outside of the EU / EEA, and specifically in countries deemed to be inadequate with respect to GDPR obligations (even a mid-sized LSP would work with hundreds of freelancers outside the EU);
  • How binding corporate rules can be applied to LSPs with a global presence;
  • Whether obliging suppliers to work in an online environment could help LSPs to comply with certain GDPR obligations

Longer-term considerations

While the GDPR presents a challenge to LSPs in the short-term, it may also impact on the longer-term purchasing habits within the industry.

For example, if LSPs are penalized for sharing personal data with freelancers located within inadequate countries (of which there is a long list), LSPs could be forced to outsource translation work within the EU / EEA / adequate countries only or even insource certain language combinations entirely, potentially driving up the cost of translation spend for some languages.

Or, if a client company is penalized for sharing personal data with a subcontractor (i.e. an LSP or freelancer) without the full knowledge and consent of the person the information relates to (known as the data subject), will they be more inclined to employ alternative buying models for their language needs: e.g. to source freelancers directly or via digital marketplaces, or implement in-house translation models of their own?

Get informed

Although most LSPs are well-acquainted with data privacy, there are a lot of unknowns around the impact of GDPR, and LSPs would be wise to tread especially carefully when it comes to handling personal data, in particular post-25 May.

Perhaps the noise around GDPR turns out to be hot air, but with companies in breach of the regulation facing possible penalties that the GDPR recommends should be “effective, proportionate and dissuasive”, it is essential to get informed, and quickly.

Reference: https://bit.ly/2Jwh9g6

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